Classics (BA)

This major is being discontinued and will not accept new students after September 30, 2020. Students who have declared this major prior to September 30, 2020 will use these standards to complete the program requirements.

Introduction

The Classics major at Canisius is designed to accommodate students interested in ancient Greek, Roman, and Mediterranean culture. We offer three tracks of study: Greek Language and Hellenic Studies (CLSG), Latin Language and Roman Studies (CLSL), and Classical Studies (CLSS).

Qualifications

Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA in their major and a 2.0 overall average to graduate with a degree in Classics.

Advisement

All students should have an advisor in the major and should contact the department directly to have an advisor assigned if they do not already have one.  Meetings with academic advisors are required prior to students receiving their PIN for course registration each semester. All majors should work closely with their advisor in discussing career expectations, choosing their major electives, developing their entire academic program and planning their co-curricular or supplemental academic experiences.

Major Experiences

Classics majors are encouraged to become members of the Canisius Classics Club and to attend the weekly departmental Classics Tea@2. Majors are also encouraged to participate in events sponsored by the Institute for Classical and Medieval Studies. Exceptional majors will be invited to become members of Eta Sigma Phi, the national Classics Honor Society.

Double Majors

Students who wish to expand their educational opportunities may decide to declare a double major. This decision may be based on career goals, planned graduate studies, and/or other student interests. Before a student declares a double major, it is important to meet with the appropriate academic departments for advisement.  In order to declare a double major, the student must complete the Major/Minor Declaration form. This form will be submitted electronically and reviewed and approved by each department chairperson as well as the appropriate associate dean. 

Per college policy, each additional major requires a minimum of 15 credits that do not apply to the student's first or subsequent major.  Some double major combinations can be completed within the minimum 120 credit hour degree requirement, but in other cases additional course work may be required. Please note that students will receive only one degree, regardless of the number of majors they complete. Both (all) majors appear on a student’s transcript.

A major in Classics is a perfect complement to majors in a broad range of disciplines — particularly Art History, Creative Writing, English, European Studies, History, Modern Languages, Political Science, Philosophy, and Religious Studies — and an excellent major for Canisius' new 3+3 Accelerated BA Plus JD program or second major for students interested in a career in medicine.

Minors in Other Disciplines

Minors provide students the opportunity to pursue additional interests but generally do not require as many courses as a major.  Minors generally range from five to eight required courses. To receive a minor, the student must complete at least 9 credit hours of coursework distinct from their other credentials (i.e., majors, other minors). The complete list of minors is available on the Canisius website and in the catalog and provides links to each minor. Some majors and minors can be completed within the minimum 120 credit hour degree requirement, but in some cases additional coursework may be required. Students must complete the appropriate minor request form.

Curriculum

An Ignatian Foundation

All undergraduate students must complete either the Canisius Core Curriculum or the All-College Honors Curriculum. Many schools refer to their college-wide undergraduate requirements as "general education" requirements. We believe that the core curriculum and the honors curriculum are more than a series of required classes; they provide the basis for a Jesuit education both with content and with required knowledge and skills attributes that are central to our mission.

Free Electives

Students may graduate with a bachelor's degree with more but not less than 120 credit hours. Free electives are courses in addition to the Canisius Core Curriculum or All-College Honors Curriculum and major requirements sufficient to reach the minimum number of credits required for graduation. The number of credits required to complete a bachelor's degree may vary depending on the student's major(s) and minor(s).

Major Requirements

All Classics Majors
CLS 103Greek History3
or CLS 104 Roman History
CLS 205Ancient Greece: Culture and Society3
or CLS 206 Ancient Rome: Culture and Society
Tracks
Select one of the following:30
Greek Language and Hellenic Studies Track/CLSG
Latin Language and Roman Studies Track/CLSL
Classical Studies Track/CLSS
Total Credits36

Greek Language and Hellenic Studies Track/CLSG

6 Classical Greek (CLG) courses (at least 6 credits at the 300 level or above)18
4 Major electives (no more than two may be Interdepartmental)12
Total Credits30

Latin Language and Roman Studies Track/CLSL

6 Latin (CLL) courses (at least 6 credits at the 300 level or above)18
4 Major electives (no more than two may be Interdepartmental)12
Total Credits30

Classical Studies Track/CLSS

4 Classical Greek (CLG) OR 4 Latin (CLL) courses (at least 6 credits at the 200 level or above)12
6 Major electives (no more than two may be Interdepartmental)18
Total Credits30

Major Electives

Any CLG, CLL, or CLS course not used as a required course within the major may serve as a Classics elective.

Departmental Electives
CLG 101Elementary Greek I 13
CLG 102Elementary Greek II 13
CLG 203- CLG 218 13
CLG 306- CLG 318 13
CLG 400Paideia 13
CLL 101Elementary Latin 23
CLL 102Elementary Latin II 23
CLL 201- CLL 218 23
CLL 301- CLL 318 2
CLL 400Humanitas3
CLS 103Greek History3
CLS 104Roman History3
CLS 205Ancient Greece: Culture and Society3
CLS 206Ancient Rome: Culture and Society3
CLS 207Mythology and Literature3
CLS 209Greek and Roman Archaeology3
CLS 211Archaeology of Pompeii3
CLS 212Borders, Walls, and Immigrants in the Ancient World3
CLS 214Greek and Roman Tragedy3
CLS 219Animals in the Ancient World3
CLS 220Greek and Latin Roots of Medical Terminology3
CLS 309Greek and Roman Religion3
CLS 311Alexander the Great3
1

6 CLG credits strongly recommended for students on CLS-Latin track.

2

6 CLL credits strongly recommended for students on CLS-Greek track.

Interdepartmental Electives
FAH 101Cave Paintings, the Colosseum & Cathedrals3
FAH 210Ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern Art3
FAH 213Greek and Roman Art3
HIS 106The Medieval World3
RST 201Introduction to the New Testament3
PHI 300History of Philosophy I3
RST 325Early Christianity3

Additional Course Considerations

Classics majors who are interested in pursuing graduate work in Classics are encouraged to enroll in German and French language courses.

Roadmap

Recommended Semester Schedule for Major Course Requirements

Freshman
FallSpring
Select one of the following:Select one of the following:
CLS 104 (if took CLS 206 in fall)
AND one of the following:
CLS 205 (if took CLS 103 in fall)
Greek track: CLG 101 (Elementary Greek I)
AND one of the following:
Latin track: CLL 101 (Elementary Latin I)
Greek track: CLG 102 (Elementary Greek II)
Classical Studies track: CLG 101 or CLL 101
Latin track: CLL 102 (Elementary Latin II)
 
Classical Studies track: continue language taken in fall (CLG 102 or CLL 102)
Sophomore
FallSpring
Classics Major elective1Classics Major elective
AND one of the following:AND one of the following:
Greek track: CLG 200-level
Greek track: CLG 200-level
Latin track: CLL 200-level
Latin track: CLL 200-level
Classical Studies track: CLG 200-level or CLL 200-level
Classical Studies track: CLG 200-level or CLL 200-level
Junior
FallSpring
Classics Major elective2Classics Major elective3
AND one of the following:AND one of the following:
Greek track: CLG 200 or 300-level
Greek track: CLG 300-level
Latin track: CLL 200 or 300-level
Latin track: CLL 300-level
Classical Studies track: one additional major elective
Classical Studies track: one additional major elective
Senior
FallSpring
Classics Major electiveClassics Major elective
AND one of the following:AND one of the following:
Greek track: CLG 300-level
Greek track: CLG 400 (Core Capstone)
Latin track: CLL 300-level
Latin track: CLL 400 (Core Capstone)
Classical Studies track: one additional major elective
Classical Studies track: CLG 400 or CLL 400 (Core Capstone)
1

The department strongly recommends majors take CLS 207 as one of their electives.

2

CLL 101 (Elementary Latin I) strongly recommended as an elective for majors on the Greek track and CLG 101 (Elementary Greek I) strongly recommended for Latin track majors.

3

CLL 102 (Elementary Latin II) strongly recommended as an elective for majors on the Greek track and CLG 102 (Elementary Greek II) strongly recommended for Latin track majors.

Learning Goals & Objectives

CONTENT:

Learning Goal 1

Students will develop proficiency in ancient Greek and/or Latin. 

Students will:
  • Objective A:  Demonstrate mastery of vocabulary, lexical skills, grammar, and syntax.
  • Objective B:  Produce a sound English translation of a Greek or Latin text which illustrates clear understanding of the text’s meaning. 

Learning Goal 2

Students will develop a command of ancient Greek and/or Roman literature and history.

Students will: 
  • Objective A:  Distinguish various features associated with major Greek and/or Latin authors and literary genres.  
  • Objective B:  Contextualize various people, events, and artifacts important to the study of Greek and/or Roman history and historiography.                                        

SKILLS:

Learning Goal 3

Students will develop proficiency in the use of reference works and databases central to the discipline of Classics.

Students will: 
  • Objective A:  Compile a bibliography on a classical subject, work, or author using standard Classics reference works and databases.
  • Objective B:  Write a paper on a classical subject, work, or author which incorporates specific Greek and/or Latin words or phrases and illustrates proficiency in using standard Classics reference works and databases. 

HUMANITAS:

Learning Goal 4

STUDENTS WILL DEVELOP A SENSE OF CONNECTION BETWEEN THE STUDY OF CLASSICS AND CARE FOR OTHERS THROUGH CLASSES AND ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATED WITH THE MAJOR. 

Students will:
  • Objective A:  Engage in a service learning opportunity in a class and write a reflective essay about the experience.
  • Objective B:  Engage in a service learning opportunity designed by themselves with the guidance of department faculty and write a reflective essay about the experience.

Minors

Minors are an important part of the undergraduate curriculum.  If students declare a minor by sophomore year, they can usually complete it in a timely manner.  Students should work with their advisor to determine if it is possible that the minor can be completed by graduation.  

To receive a minor, a student must complete at least 9 credit hours of coursework distinct from their major(s) and from other minors, and students must complete more than 50% of the coursework required for the minor at Canisius. Please note that “ancillary/supporting” courses required for a major may still count as distinct courses as long as the remaining coursework still meets the 30 credit-hours required for a major. For more information about minor policies, please see the Declaring Majors and Minors page in the catalog.

Classics Minor

A minor in Classics complements the disciplines of Art History, Creative Writing, English, History, Modern Languages, Political Science, Philosophy, Religious Studies, and it is especially beneficial for students interested in careers in law or medicine. Classics minors are encouraged to become members of the Canisius Classics Club, to attend the weekly departmental Classics Tea@2, and to participate in events sponsored by the Institute for Classical and Medieval Studies

Students must complete the appropriate minor request form.

Students who wish to minor in Classics must meet the following requirements:

Classical Language (CLG or CLL) Required Courses
Two semesters of Greek or Latin (CLG OR CLL)6
Classics (CLS) Required Courses
CLS 103Greek History3
or CLS 104 Roman History
CLS 205Ancient Greece: Culture and Society3
or CLS 206 Ancient Rome: Culture and Society
Classics Electives
Two upper-level electives from the following:6
Any CLG, CLL, or CLS courses at the 200-level or above
Ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern Art
Greek and Roman Art
Total Credits18

Courses

Classics (CLS); Greek (CLG); Latin (CLL)

Classics--CLS

CLS 103 Greek History 3 Credits

Social, political, and intellectual history of the Greeks from the end of the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period.

Fulfills College Core: Field 4 (History), Global Awareness

Offered: every fall.

CLS 104 Roman History 3 Credits

Social, political, and intellectual history of Rome from the foundation of the city to late antiquity.

Fulfills College Core: Field 4 (History), Global Awareness

Offered: every spring.

CLS 205 Ancient Greece: Culture and Society 3 Credits

Fundamental social, political, moral, religious, and intellectual aspects of the human condition as reflected in a variety of Greek writers, art, and artifacts.

Fulfills College Core: Field 3 (Literature and the Arts), Global Awareness

Offered: once a year.

CLS 206 Ancient Rome: Culture and Society 3 Credits

Fundamental social, political, moral, religious, and intellectual aspects of the human condition as reflected in a variety of Roman writers, art, and artifacts.

Fulfills College Core: Field 3 (Literature and the Arts), Global Awareness

Offered: once a year.

CLS 207 Mythology and Literature 3 Credits

Origin, content, and interpretation of the major classical myths. Modern approaches to mythology. Influence upon literature and ethical principles and theories.

Fulfills College Core: Ethics, Field 3 (Literature and the Arts)

Offered: fall & spring.

CLS 209 Greek and Roman Archaeology 3 Credits

History, methods, major sites, and current topics in Greek and Roman Archaeology from the Bronze Age through Late Antiquity.

Fulfills College Core: Field 5 (Social Sciences), Global Awareness

Offered: spring of odd-numbered years.

CLS 211 Archaeology of Pompeii 3 Credits

On August 24th, 79 C.E., Mt. Vesuvius erupted and destroyed the towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum, as well as countless farms and villas in the countryside. The ash and pyroclastic flows killed all who had not yet fled, and preserved the cities in the moment of their destruction. Their archaeological rediscovery in the 1700s led to 250 years of excavations which have continued to provide us with astonishing evidence about the people who lived and died in the shadow of Vesuvius. Every aspect of ancient life is represented in these two towns—poor and rich, free and enslaved, work and leisure, religion, politics, art, food, and even sex. If you want to know what it was like to live in the Roman Empire, don’t go to Rome—come to Pompeii!

Prerequisite: None. Corequisite: None.

Fulfills College Core: Field 5 (Social Sciences), Global Awareness

Offered: spring of even-numbered years.

CLS 212 Borders, Walls, and Immigrants in the Ancient World 3 Credits

Examination of momentous migrations and displacements around the Mediterranean (Greek colonization, Roman veteran settlement, Gothic invasions), from the Bronze Age to the Middle Ages; the economic, religious, social, and political motivations; the impact; Greco-Roman concepts of borders and “Frontier”; case studies (Hadrian's Wall); themes in immigration studies, including theories of assimilation/resistance, diaspora, ethnicity, and identity.

Fulfills College Core: Field 5 (Social Sciences), Global Awareness

Offered: occasionally.

CLS 214 Greek and Roman Tragedy 3 Credits

Study of Greek and Roman tragedy, its origins, cultural setting, staging, performance, and influence. Readings from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, and Seneca.

Fulfills College Core: Ethics, Field 3 (Literature and the Arts), Oral Communication

Offered: fall & spring.

CLS 216 Race and Ethnicity in the Ancient World 3 Credits

This course will explore ancient theories on race and ethnicity from Homer to Late Antiquity and how these theories have been read and internalized in modern times, with a special emphasis on their influence on the construction of identity and race in the modern United States. Through the study of a broad range of ancient texts in translation, we will investigate how ancient Greeks and Romans talked about, represented, and attempted to understand and categorize human diversity — what we call race and ethnicity.

Prerequisite: none. Corequisite: none.

Fulfills College Core: Field 4 (History)

Offered: fall of even-numbered years.

CLS 219 Animals in the Ancient World 3 Credits

This course studies the role animals played in ancient human societies through their use and function in mythology, religious thought, literature, social identity, and rituals, and in how they were analyzed and imagined. Students learn what the study of archaeology, art, literature, and anthropology tell us about the cultural importance of animals to ancient civilizations. A range of archaeological and anthropological evidence will be analyzed and discussions will be based on contemporary critical animal theory. Students also read a broad range of texts in translation (including epic, fable, novel, philosophy, natural science) and explore themes of sacrifice, initiation, metamorphosis, animal culture, and the customs and ethics of eating animals, and of using them for military purpose, entertainment or spectacle.

Fulfills College Core: Field 5 (Social Sciences), Global Awareness

Offered: occasionally.

CLS 220 Greek and Latin Roots of Medical Terminology 3 Credits

An introductory course on the fundamental Greek and Latin roots of medical terminology in preparation for a career in the health sciences professions. Acquire knowledge to understand, speak, and write the language of contemporary medicine by learning how to analyze roots, prefixes, and suffixes, and their predictable patterns of combinations. Material covered includes anatomy, all systems of the human body, psychology and substance terminology, along with basic language history, linguistic principles, and etymology.

Offered: occasionally.

CLS 306 Blood, Pus, and Vomit: Studying Ancient Medicine 3 Credits

This course is a survey of the art of medicine in the ancient Mediterranean: what causes medical problems and what those problems were, how diagnoses were determined, the treatments available and who administered them, and how each society learned from the others. The course begins with ancient Mesopotamia, then turns attention to Egypt, Greece, the Hellenistic world, and finally the Roman empire. Concentration is on the ancient world, but the course includes discussion of the techniques and theories developed then which were still being taught in medical schools in the 19th century and beyond.

Prerequisite: none. Corequisite: none.

Fulfills College Core: Oral Communication

Offered: spring of even-numbered years.

CLS 309 Greek and Roman Religion 3 Credits

Religious thought and action in ancient Greece and Rome from Homer through the 2nd century A.D. Polytheism, anthropomorphism, ritual, cult and sacrifice.

Fulfills College Core: Field 1 (Religious Studies and Theology), Global Awareness, Oral Communication

Offered: every fall.

CLS 311 Alexander the Great 3 Credits

Philip II and the rise of Macedon. Alexander's personality, his conquests, and the social, political, and intellectual consequences of his reign. Hellenistic culture.

Fulfills College Core: Global Awareness

Offered: anticipated spring 2022.

CLS 314 The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire 3 Credits

Imperial crisis and recovery of the third century, Constantine and Christianity, barbarian invasions, social, political, and intellectual developments in the Byzantine East and Latin West. Historiography of the "Decline and Fall."

Offered: anticipated spring 2021.

CLS 499 Independent Study 3-6 Credits

Directed research on a selected topic. Independent studies require an application and approval by the associate dean.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, department chair, & associate dean.

Offered: occasionally.

Greek--CLG

CLG 101 Elementary Greek I 3 Credits

Intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Greek. Selected readings. Fall.

Offered: every fall.

CLG 102 Elementary Greek II 3 Credits

Intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Greek. Selected readings.

Prerequisite: CLG 101 or permission of instructor.

Offered: every spring.

CLG 201 Intermediate Greek I 3 Credits

Intermediate Greek

Prerequisite: CLG 102 or permission of instructor.

Offered: occasionally.

CLG 203 Greek Literature: Homer 3 Credits

Selected readings from Homer.

Prerequisite: CLG 102 or permission of instructor.

CLG 204 Greek Literature: Euripides 3 Credits

Study of the genre of Greek tragedy with readings of one or more tragedies of Euripides.

Prerequisite: CLG 101 and CLG 102.

Offered: occasionally.

CLG 213 Greek Philosophers 3 Credits

Book I of Plato's Republic and related texts.

Prerequisite: CLG 102 or permission of instructor.

CLG 214 Readings in Greek Philosophy 3 Credits

Heraclitus and Book 1 of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.

Prerequisite: CLG 102 or permission of instructor.

Offered: occasionally.

CLG 305 Readings in Greek Literature: Daphnis and Chloe 3 Credits

Longus' Daphnis and Chloe.

Prerequisite: CLG 102 or permission of instructor.

CLG 308 Readings in Greek History Greek Epigraphy 3 Credits

The course introduces students to the study of Greek inscriptions and their use as evidence for the study of ancient history

Prerequisite: CLG 102 or permission of instructor.

Offered: occasionally.

CLG 314 Readings in Greek Philosophy 3 Credits

Heraclitus and Book 1 of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.

Prerequisites: CLG 102 or permission of instructor.

Offered: occasionally.

CLG 400 Paideia 3 Credits

Selected Greek authors, texts, themes, or genres.

Prerequisite: at least two semesters of CLG courses, completion of all other core curriculum requirements, & permission of the chair or instructor.

Latin--CLL

CLL 101 Elementary Latin 3 Credits

Intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Latin. Selected readings.

Offered: every fall.

CLL 102 Elementary Latin II 3 Credits

Intensive introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of classical Latin. Selected readings.

Prerequisite: CLL 101, or one year of high school Latin through the senior year, or permission of instructor.

Offered: every spring.

CLL 201 Latin Literature 3 Credits

Selected Latin literary authors, genres, or themes.

Prerequisite: CLL 102, or two years of high school Latin through the senior year, or permission of instructor.

CLL 203 Roman Comedy 3 Credits

Close reading and analysis of selected comedies from Plautus and Terence. Study of the relation to Greek new Comedy, colloquial Latin language, and social structures in Rome revealed in the plays.

Prerequisite: CLL 102 or permission of instructor.

Offered: occasionally.

CLL 204 Readings in Latin Literature 3 Credits

Selected Latin literary authors, genres, or themes.

Prerequisite: CLL 102, or two years of high school Latin through the senior year, or permission of instructor.

CLL 205 Latin Literature 3 Credits

Selected Latin literary authors, genres, or themes.

Prerequisite: CLL 102, or two years of high school Latin through the senior year, or permission of instructor.

CLL 210 Roman Historians 3 Credits

Close reading and analysis of selections from one or more o fthe Latin historians. Sallust, Livy and Tacitus.

Prerequisite: CLL 102 or permission of instructor.

Offered: occasionally.

CLL 301 Latin Epic Poetry Lucan 3 Credits

This advanced Latin course is dedicated to translating selections from Lucan's epic poem the Pharsalia. Through a close reading of the Pharsalia, students will develop an increased mastery of Latin syntax and improve their translation speed. Described by scholars as the "anti-Aeneid", Lucan's Pharsalia recounts the civil war between Julius Caesar and Pompey Magnus.

Prerequisite: CLL 102, or two years of high school Latin through the senior year, or permission of instructor.

Offered: Spring 2022.

CLL 310 Roman Historians 3 Credits

Close reading and analysis of selections from one or more o fthe Latin historians. Sallust, Livy and Tacitus.

Prerequisite: CLL 102 or permission of instructor.

CLL 350 Latin Composition 3 Credits

CLL 350 aims to increase mastery of the Latin language by a systematic review of syntax, the close reading of passages of Caesar, Cicero, and other major Latin authors, and the translation of English sentences and short passages of accelerated difficulty into Latin. This course is primarily online, but there will be a few face-to-face class meetings.

Prerequisite: Four semesters of college Latin or equivalent required. Corequisite: Students enrolled in CLL 350 must be simultaneously enrolled in an upper-level Latin literature course.

Offered: This course will be offered only on an as-needed basis.

CLL 400 Humanitas 3 Credits

Selected Latin authors, texts, themes, or genres.

Prerequisite: at least two semesters of CLL courses, completion of core requirements, & permission of the chair.

Fulfills College Core: Core Capstone

Offered: fall & spring.

CLL 499 Independent Study: Latin 3 Credits

Directed research on a selected topic. Independent studies require an application and approval by the associate dean.

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor, department chair, & associate dean.

Offered: occasionally.