Physician Assistant Studies (MS)

Draft for internal use only

The Physician Assistant program at Canisius is a 27-month, master’s degree program. It has two main phases: didactic and clinical. In the didactic phase, you’ll spend the first 15 months in a classroom setting with access to virtual anatomy tables, patient simulators and models. You’ll have multiple opportunities to practice your skills in patient interviews, physical exams, diagnostic testing and procedures while working in a brand new, state-of-the art learning lab located in Science Hall. You’ll be taught by program faculty as well as distinguished guests with extensive experience in their field.

The second phase will be 12 months of clinical experience. You’ll be required to attend 4-week clinical rotations in family medicine/primary care, internal medicine (inpatient and outpatient), emergency medicine, surgery, women’s health, pediatrics, and behavioral  health. In addition, you’ll have the opportunity to choose from two elective rotations in areas such as orthopedics, critical care, neurology, cardiology, rheumatology and other subspecialties.Canisius College has applied for Accreditation - Provisional from the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA). Canisius College anticipates matriculating its first class in January 2020, pending achieving Accreditation - Provisional status at the June 2019 ARC-PA meeting and New York State Department of Education approval.

Accreditation - Provisional is an accreditation status granted when the plans and resource allocation, if fully implemented as planned, of a proposed program that has not yet enrolled students appear to demonstrate the program’s ability to meet the ARC-PA Standards or when a program holding accreditation-provisional status appears to demonstrate continued progress in complying with the Standards as it prepares for the graduation of the first class (cohort) of students. In the event that ARC-PA withholds accreditation, the Canisius College PA Program will not admit students to begin in January 2020, and will continue development and pursuit of accreditation in the next available cycle.

Draft for internal use only

Curriculum

PAS 501Applied Human Anatomy I2
PAS 502Applied Human Anatomy II2
PAS 503Applied Human Anatomy III2
PAS 511Pathophysiology Basics I1
PAS 512Pathophysiology Basics II1
PAS 513Pathophysiology Basics III1
PAS 521Clinical Medicine I4
PAS 522Clinical Medicine II4
PAS 523Clinical Medicine III4
PAS 531Pharmacotherapeutics I2
PAS 532Pharmacotherapeutics II2
PAS 533Pharmacotherapeutics III2
PAS 541Physical Diagnosis I2
PAS 542Physical Diagnosis II2
PAS 543Physical Diagnosis III2
PAS 551Diagnostic Medicine I1
PAS 552Diagnostic Medicine II1
PAS 553Behavioral Science1
PAS 561Clinical Skills I3
PAS 562Clinical Skills II3
PAS 563Clinical Skills III3
PAS 571Professional Development I1
PAS 634Clinical Skills IV/Seminars3
PAS 572Professional Development II1
PAS 573Professional Development III1
PAS 674Professional Development IV2
PAS 777Professional Development V2
PAS 624Clinical Bootcamp for Physician Assistants4
PAS 644Community Health1
PAS 654Medical Microbiology & Infectious Disease2
PAS 737Palliative Care and End-of Life Considerations1
PAS 755Master’s Research & Writing I1
PAS 756Master’s Research & Writing II1
PAS 705Primary Care/Family Medicine Rotation4
PAS 706Pediatrics Rotation4
PAS 715Internal Medicine Outpatient Rotation4
PAS 716Women’s Health Rotation4
PAS 725Internal Medicine Inpatient Rotation4
PAS 726Emergency Medicine Rotation4
PAS 735General Surgery Rotation4
PAS 736Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine Rotation4
PAS 717Elective Rotation4
PAS 717Elective Rotation4
PAS 745Clinical Seminar I1
PAS 746Clinical Seminar II1
PAS 747Clinical Seminar III2
PAS 799Capstone Seminar2
Total Credits111

Draft for internal use only

Roadmap

First Year
 SpringSummer
 PAS 501PAS 502
 PAS 511PAS 512
 PAS 521PAS 522
 PAS 531PAS 532
 PAS 541PAS 542
 PAS 551PAS 552
 PAS 561PAS 562
 PAS 571PAS 572
Second Year
FallSpringSummer
PAS 503PAS 624PAS 7051
PAS 513PAS 634PAS 7151
PAS 523PAS 644PAS 7251
PAS 533PAS 654PAS 7351
PAS 543PAS 674PAS 745
PAS 553 PAS 755
PAS 563  
PAS 573  
Third Year
FallSpring 
PAS 7061PAS 7171 
PAS 7161PAS 7171 
PAS 7261PAS 737 
PAS 7361PAS 747 
PAS 746PAS 777 
PAS 756PAS 799 

Draft for internal use only

Learning Goals & Objectives

Upon completion of the Canisius College Physician Assistant Program, the graduate will be able to:

1. Elicit a medical history

  • Ensure patient comfort and privacy
  • Review medical record in preparation for patient encounter
  • Establish trust with patient and/or family to elicit honest and complete information; maintain ethically sound and therapeutic relationship with patient and/or family
  • Adjust interviewing techniques according to reason for visit, patient demographics, etc.
  • Consider psychosocial factors which may impact patient’s health
  • Include all relevant components in obtaining and reporting patient history, including an appropriate review of systems to the complaint

 2. Perform a physical examination

  • Explain examination procedures in terms that are understandable by patient and/or family
  • Obtain written and/or verbal consent for examination as appropriate
  • Ensure patient comfort and privacy
  • Utilize diagnostic tools appropriately
  • Assess general health status of patient
  • Utilize the skills of inspection, palpation, percussion and auscultation
  • Obtain vital signs
  • Examine/assess appropriate systems based on complaint
  • Employ special procedures where appropriate
  • Seek chaperone or assistance when appropriate or requested by patient 
  • Differentiate normal and abnormal findings

3. Analyze data and develop a differential diagnosis

  • Analyze subjective and objective findings
  • Recognize diagnostic results as they pertain to history and physical examination 
  • Recognize impact of social and behavioral issues while considering appropriate diagnosis
  • Apply principles of epidemiology and principles of evidence-based medicine
  • Formulate appropriate differential diagnosis
  • Understand principles of triage and adapt data gathering and intervention according to level of acuity 
  • Communicate concise report of findings and differential diagnosis quickly and effectively to the health care team when appropriate

 4. Develop a diagnostic management plan

  • Develop a clear differential diagnosis based on history and physical findings to justify diagnostic management
  • Order appropriate diagnostic tests based upon differential diagnosis
  • Perform and interpret diagnostic tests as appropriate, including health screenings based on risk factors
  • Consider cost, sensitivity, specificity, invasiveness, and appropriate sequencing 
  • Consider appropriate referrals as needed
  • Make informed decisions about diagnostic interventions based upon patient information and preferences, as well as up-to-date scientific evidence and clinical judgment

5. Develop a therapeutic management plan

  • Apply principles of pharmacotherapeutics and make informed decisions about therapeutic interventions based on patient preference and scientific evidence
  • Consider patient’s overall condition and likelihood of compliance with plan including socioeconomic factors
  • Empower patient and/or family in medical decision-making process
  • Include non-pharmacologic modalities as appropriate
  • Consider referral as needed, with consideration of cost, time, and likely outcomes
  • Ensure implementation and appropriate follow up
  • Demonstrate ability to adjust plan as needed
  • Obtain patient’s informed consent as appropriate
  • Provide access to supportive resources and agencies to improve patient compliance and outcomes when needed

6. Provide patient education

  • Inform patient of rights and maximize autonomy related to patient’s care
  • Explain medical information in a manner the patient and/or family can easily understand
  • Adjust instruction for patient and/or family based on cultural, education, or socioeconomic factors
  • Instruct patients in health promotion and disease prevention principles
  • Assist patient/family with utilization of community services
  • Develop patient education materials that are appropriate to patient population and easily accessible to support staff
  • Participate in community outreach and health education service
  • Demonstrate awareness of limitations in educating underserved patient populations and work to improve communication

 7. Maintain secure medical records

  • Obtain and input biographical data for patient
  • Document history, physical examination, progress notes, orders, etc. in a clear and concise manner
  • Utilize proper medical charting principles to accurately document and record information regarding findings and care processes for medical, legal, quality and financial purposes.
  • Prepare adequate and thorough summaries as needed (admission, discharge, surgery etc.)
  • Use written, oral, and electronic communication techniques in a manner that can be easily interpreted and followed by the medical team
  • Obtain physician co-signature when appropriate
  • Maintain confidentiality of oral, written, and electronic records at all times

 8. Perform medical and surgical techniques

  • Perform in-house diagnostic testing including x-ray, ultrasound, EKG, and fetal monitoring.
  • Obtain laboratory specimens (blood, fluid or tissue)
  • Provide wound care including irrigation, stapling, suturing and removal of foreign bodies
  • Provide appropriate immobilization of injuries including splinting and casting
  • Administer medications by various routes including IV, IM, inhaled, oral, etc.
  • Assist in surgery (first or second assist)
  • Perform basic office-based procedures (e.g. removal/cryosurgery of superficial lesions, ear irrigation, joint injections etc.) 
  • Use principles of aseptic technique and universal precautions at all times when appropriate
  • Perform basic and advanced cardiac life support

 9. Demonstrate professionalism

  • Demonstrate clear and effective oral, written, and electronic communication skills
  • Maintain patient confidentiality and trust
  • Maintain high moral and ethical standards
  • Work effectively with physicians and other health care professionals as member or leader of a health care team or other professional group
  • Demonstrate respect for individual, religious, and cultural diversity
  • Recognize professional and personal limitations and seek physician or peer counsel when needed
  • Apply humanistic approach to health care (includes respect, compassion and integrity)
  • Adapt patient care practices to reflect environment and resources 
  • Demonstrate emotional resilience and stability, adaptability, flexibility and tolerance
  • Display a service oriented attitude
  • Advocate for and/or participates in care of medically underserved population
  • Support local, state, and national physician assistant associations 

10. Utilize administrative, management and research skills

  • Comply with local, state and federal laws and regulations; keep up to date on legislative changes affecting scope of practice
  • Maintain certification and state licensure
  • Monitor patient care for quality outcomes and cost effectiveness
  • Follow guidelines for third-party reimbursement
  • Critically analyze scientific and medical literature
  • Conduct or analyze research to improve patient care and outcomes
  • Utilize legal and ethical guidelines in medical decision making and patient practices

 11. Acknowledge the importance of lifelong learning professional education 

  • Maintain continuing medical education
  • Keep abreast of current medical/surgical trends and technology
  • Provide education to the community and/or profession
  • Keep abreast of technological advances and implement in healthcare delivery when possible
  • Seek professional and personal growth opportunities
  • Regularly engage in active scholarship and teaching

Draft for internal use only

Courses

PAS 501 Applied Human Anatomy I 2 Credits

Applied Human Anatomy I is the first of three courses that provides students with a detailed examination of all structural aspects of the human body. The course is presented by regions and allows students to learn and assimilate the morphology of different areas of the human body in an organized and logical fashion using Anatomage virtual anatomy tables. This course is taught in a modular format covering topics that will correlate with Pathophysiology I and Clinical Medicine I. The course content is designed to correlate with important clinical problems that students may encounter as practitioners, and students are encouraged to start acquainting themselves with ways that anatomical alterations can affect normal function. Anatomical structures are correlated with radiographic images in each of the regions studied. The course is taught via independent study, lectures, class discussions, and laboratory dissection of virtual human cadavers. Topics covered in this course include introduction to gross anatomy and use of Anatomage tables, cardiovascular system, pulmonary system, and endocrine system.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 502 Applied Human Anatomy II 2 Credits

Applied Human Anatomy II is the second of three courses that provides students with a detailed examination of all structural aspects of the human body. The course is presented by regions and allows students to learn and assimilate the morphology of different areas of the human body in an organized and logical fashion using Anatomage virtual anatomy tables. This course is taught in a modular format covering topics that will correlate with Pathophysiology II and Clinical Medicine II. The course content is designed to correlate with important clinical problems that students may encounter as practitioners, and students are encouraged to start acquainting themselves with ways that anatomical alterations can affect normal function. Anatomical structures are correlated with radiographic images in each of the regions studied. The course is taught via independent study, lectures, class discussions, and laboratory dissection of virtual human cadavers. Organ systems covered in this course include musculoskeletal, GI, renal and GU, reproductive.

Prerequisite: PAS 501.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 503 Applied Human Anatomy III 2 Credits

Applied Human Anatomy III is the third of three courses that provides students with a detailed examination of all structural aspects of the human body. The course is presented by regions and allows students to learn and assimilate the morphology of different areas of the human body in an organized and logical fashion using Anatomage virtual anatomy tables. This course is taught in a modular format covering topics that will correlate with Pathophysiology III and Clinical Medicine III. The course content is designed to correlate with important clinical problems that students may encounter as practitioners, and students are encouraged to start acquainting themselves with ways that anatomical alterations can affect normal function. Anatomical structures are correlated with radiographic images in each of the regions studied. The course is taught via independent study, lectures, class discussions, and laboratory dissection of virtual human cadavers. Organ systems covered in this course include integumentary, hematology, nervous system w head and neck, and ENT.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in PAS 501 and PAS 502.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 511 Pathophysiology Basics I 1 Credit

This is the first of three courses that focus on physiological processes that influence the human organism at the cellular, organ and systemic levels. Includes a discussion of normal function/physiology and how abnormal pathophysiology impacts the patient’s health. A combination of lecture and case study seminars are used to assist students in the application of fundamental principles to clinical situations and to begin the process of understanding dysfunction and pathology likely to be encountered in the clinical setting. The first course of this series will introduce general concepts, then investigate common pathologies for systems being covered simultaneously in Applied Human Anatomy I and Clinical Medicine I.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 512 Pathophysiology Basics II 1 Credit

This is the second of three courses that focus on physiological processes that influence the human organism at the cellular, organ and systemic levels. Includes a discussion of normal function/physiology and how abnormal pathophysiology impacts the patient’s health. A combination of lecture and case study seminars are used to assist students in the application of fundamental principles to clinical situations and to begin the process of understanding dysfunction and pathology likely to be encountered in the clinical setting. The second course of this series will introduce general concepts, then investigate common pathologies for systems being covered simultaneously in Applied Human Anatomy II and Clinical Medicine II.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of B in PAS 511.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 513 Pathophysiology Basics III 1 Credit

This is the third of three courses that focus on physiological processes that influence the human organism at the cellular, organ and systemic levels. Includes a discussion of normal function/physiology and how abnormal pathophysiology impacts the patient’s health. A combination of lecture and case study seminars are used to assist students in the application of fundamental principles to clinical situations and to begin the process of understanding dysfunction and pathology likely to be encountered in the clinical setting. The third course of this series will introduce general concepts, then investigate common pathologies for systems being covered simultaneously in Applied Human Anatomy III and Clinical Medicine III.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of B in PAS 511 and PAS 512.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 521 Clinical Medicine I 4 Credits

The Clinical Medicine Series presents the application of advanced anatomy, pathophysiology, and epidemiology to common health conditions involved in each body system. Clinical Medicine I is the first of three courses in this series. Students will investigate signs, symptoms, and presentations of a variety of health conditions that correlate to the body system being studied in advanced human anatomy and pathophysiology at that time. This includes using evidence-based medicine in a wide range of disease states to formulate a differential diagnosis, order and interpret diagnostic studies, determine prognosis, and develop patient management plans.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 522 Clinical Medicine II 4 Credits

The Clinical Medicine Series presents the application of advanced anatomy, pathophysiology, and epidemiology to common health conditions involved in each body system. Clinical Medicine II is the second of three courses in this series. Students will investigate signs, symptoms, and presentations of a variety of health conditions that correlate to the body system being studied in advanced human anatomy and pathophysiology at that time. This includes using evidence-based medicine in a wide range of disease states to formulate a differential diagnosis, order and interpret diagnostic studies, determine prognosis, and develop patient management plans.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in PAS 521.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 523 Clinical Medicine III 4 Credits

The Clinical Medicine Series presents the application of advanced anatomy, pathophysiology, and epidemiology to common health conditions involved in each body system. Clinical Medicine III is the third of three courses in this series. Students will investigate signs, symptoms, and presentations of a variety of health conditions that correlate to the body system being studied in advanced human anatomy and pathophysiology at that time. This includes using evidence-based medicine in a wide range of disease states to formulate a differential diagnosis, order and interpret diagnostic studies, determine prognosis, and develop patient management plans.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in PAS 521 and PAS 522.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 531 Pharmacotherapeutics I 2 Credits

This course is the first of three courses that teach the fundamental principles of pharmacotherapy by presenting the rationale for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific range of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics in Clinical Medicine I. The course explores how medications are delivered to the body, how they are eliminated from the body and how they work in the body. Key concepts include mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug targets, pharmaceutical math, drug toxicity and drug interactions. Lecture material is augmented by case‐based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Students learn to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. This will occur with individual critical thinking as well as group discussion.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 532 Pharmacotherapeutics II 2 Credits

This course is the second of three courses that teach the fundamental principles of pharmacotherapy by presenting the rationale for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific range of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics in Clinical Medicine II. The course explores how medications are delivered to the body, how they are eliminated from the body and how they work in the body. Key concepts include mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug targets, pharmaceutical math, drug toxicity and drug interactions. Lecture material is augmented by case‐based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Students learn to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. This will occur with individual critical thinking as well as group discussion.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in PAS 531.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 533 Pharmacotherapeutics III 2 Credits

This course is the third of three courses that teach the fundamental principles of pharmacotherapy by presenting the rationale for treatments as well as the recommended treatment plans for a specific range of disease processes, symptoms and conditions in sequence with body system topics in Clinical Medicine III. The course explores how medications are delivered to the body, how they are eliminated from the body and how they work in the body. Key concepts include mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, drug targets, pharmaceutical math, drug toxicity and drug interactions. Lecture material is augmented by case‐based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. Students learn to individualize medication regimens based on drug attributes, clinical evidence, comorbidities, drug mechanism of action, drug safety, monitoring parameters and treatment cost. Lecture material is augmented by case-based exercises designed to develop pharmacotherapy decision making skills. This will occur with individual critical thinking as well as group discussion.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in PAS 531 and PAS 532.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 541 Physical Diagnosis I 2 Credits

The Physical Diagnosis Courses provide an introduction to general clinical medicine across the lifespan. Students will learn the knowledge and skills essential for performing a medical history and physical examination. The course emphasizes patient interviewing, acquiring a medical data base, and performing a comprehensive physical examination. Lectures and reading assignments emphasize core concepts. Special sessions are used to optimize teaching of concepts in several subject areas. Over the entire semester, close interaction occurs between students and instructors during repeated practice of these skills. Students will learn using independent study and lecture to provide a foundation of principles to be discussed with team-based problem solving and patient simulation.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 542 Physical Diagnosis II 2 Credits

The Physical Diagnosis Courses provide an introduction to general clinical medicine across the lifespan. Students will learn the knowledge and skills essential for performing a medical history and physical examination. The course emphasizes patient interviewing, acquiring a medical data base, and performing a comprehensive physical examination. Lectures and reading assignments emphasize core concepts. Special sessions are used to optimize teaching of concepts in several subject areas. Over the entire semester, close interaction occurs between students and instructors during repeated practice of these skills. Students will learn using independent study and lecture to provide a foundation of principles to be discussed with team-based problem solving and patient simulation.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 543 Physical Diagnosis III 2 Credits

The Physical Diagnosis Courses provide an introduction to general clinical medicine across the lifespan. Students will learn the knowledge and skills essential for performing a medical history and physical examination. The course emphasizes patient interviewing, acquiring a medical data base, and performing a comprehensive physical examination. Lectures and reading assignments emphasize core concepts. Special sessions are used to optimize teaching of concepts in several subject areas. Over the entire semester, close interaction occurs between students and instructors during repeated practice of these skills. Students will learn using independent study and lecture to provide a foundation of principles to be discussed with team-based problem solving and patient simulation.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 551 Diagnostic Medicine I 1 Credit

This course teaches the concepts and practice of ordering and interpreting laboratory, imaging and diagnostic tests utilized in current medical practice. Course includes indications, contraindications, precautions, complications, techniques, cost-effectiveness, patient preparation, and ordering and interpretation of specific labs and tests. This includes how and when to order various radiologic testing, laboratory testing, EKG, as well as how to interpret results. Students will also be introduced to identifying normal variants and common pathologies in radiology and lab results.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 552 Diagnostic Medicine II 1 Credit

This course teaches the concepts and practice of ordering and interpreting laboratory, imaging and diagnostic tests utilized in current medical practice. Course includes indications, contraindications, precautions, complications, techniques, cost-effectiveness, patient preparation, and ordering and interpretation of specific labs and tests. This includes how and when to order various radiologic testing, laboratory testing, EKG, as well as how to interpret results. Students will also be introduced to identifying normal variants and common pathologies in radiology and lab results.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 553 Behavioral Science 1 Credit

This course focuses on understanding human behavior in health and illness. Case studies and team problem-solving will be the emphasis of this course in addition to lecture and simulation/role play. PA students will be asked to think critically about multiple issues that transcend bioscience, and emphasize psychology, social science and spirituality in a patient-centered forum. Additionally, we will include a variety of perspectives, discuss social contexts, consider equity and justice.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 561 Clinical Skills I 3 Credits

This course is the first in a series of four courses taught over the first four semesters in conjunction with clinical medicine, developing hands-on skills in performing specialized testing and maneuvers to investigate commons acute, chronic, and routine conditions. Students will be given an opportunity to observe, practice, and teach skills in repetition to promote comfort and confidence in preparation for the clinical setting. A combination of teaching methods will be used including independent reading, observation, simulation, and hands-on practicum.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 562 Clinical Skills II 3 Credits

This course is the second in a series of four courses taught over the first four semesters in conjunction with clinical medicine, developing hands-on skills in performing specialized testing and maneuvers to investigate commons acute, chronic, and routine conditions. Students will be given an opportunity to observe, practice, and teach skills in repetition to promote comfort and confidence in preparation for the clinical setting. A combination of teaching methods will be used including independent reading, observation, simulation, and hands-on practicum.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in PAS 561.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 563 Clinical Skills III 3 Credits

This course is the third in a series of four courses taught over the first four semesters in conjunction with clinical medicine, developing hands-on skills in performing specialized testing and maneuvers to investigate commons acute, chronic, and routine conditions. Students will be given an opportunity to observe, practice, and teach skills in repetition to promote comfort and confidence in preparation for the clinical setting. A combination of teaching methods will be used including independent reading, observation, simulation, and hands-on practicum.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of C- in PAS 561 and PAS 562.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 571 Professional Development I 1 Credit

This course is the first of a series of five courses designed to develop the physician assistant professional. In this first course, students will be introduced to cultural awareness and social justice. Instructors and guest speakers will expose students to challenging scenarios that require professional interaction to heighten personal awareness and cultural competence in order to improve ability to work with challenging patients. Topics include effective participation on the interprofessional care team, cultural awareness, and academic integrity.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 572 Professional Development II 1 Credit

This course is the second of a series of five courses designed to develop the physician assistant professional. In this course, students will learn more about the history of the profession, develop skills ineffective participation on the interprofessional team, improve cultural awareness, and gain a better understanding about academic integrity. Instructors and guest speakers will expose students to challenging scenarios that require professional interaction to heighten personal awareness and cultural competence in order to improve ability to work with challenging patients. Topics include effective participation on the interprofessional care team, cultural awareness, academic integrity, and history of the profession.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 573 Professional Development III 1 Credit

This course is the third of a series of five courses designed to develop the physician assistant professional. In this course, students will learn more about risk management and patient safety, medical ethics, critically analyzing evidence-based medicine, and advocating for vulnerable patients. Instructors and guest speakers will expose students to challenging scenarios that require professional interaction to heighten personal awareness and prepare students for recognizing and addressing health care disparity and improving patient safety and outcomes.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 624 Clinical Bootcamp for Physician Assistants 4 Credits

This course is designed as a culmination of the courses taught over the first three semesters, where students will have seminars and lab practicals to refine their skills in preparation for student clerkships. Observed simulations of history taking, physical examination, interventions and procedures, and medical decision making will occur here, and students will have the opportunity to gain additional training in areas they are not secure in. This intensive “Bootcamp” is designed to challenge students to identify strengths and weaknesses, and become more secure working in the real-world setting.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 634 Clinical Skills IV/Seminars 3 Credits

This course is the final in a series of four courses taught over the first four semesters in conjunction with clinical medicine, developing hands-on skills in performing specialized testing and maneuvers to investigate commons acute, chronic, and routine conditions. Students will be given an opportunity to observe, practice, and teach skills in repetition to promote comfort and confidence in preparation for the clinical setting. A combination of teaching methods will be used including independent reading, observation, simulation, and hands-on practicum. Students will also have formal BLS, ACLS, and PALS training in seminars. Additionally, students will engage in interprofessional education clinics with emphasis on working with multiple health care disciplines, and will have advanced medicine seminars focused on emergency and critical care.

Prerequisite: minimum grade of B in PAS 561, PAS 562, and PAS 563.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 644 Community Health 1 Credit

This course is designed to prepare students to care for individuals and families across the lifespan. This includes preventative healthcare, as well as the assessment, diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic illness and preventative health care for individuals and families from infant through elderly. The purpose of this course is to introduce the basic principles which guide growth and development and the health of individuals across the lifespan. This course covers several themes, including contributions of biological and environmental factors to health and human development, measuring the health of individuals in communities, understanding determinants and consequences of health and development across the lifespan, measuring population health, and assessing the implications of health disparities. This course is also provides a basic introduction into concepts of public health maintenance, disease prevention, infection control, occupational health, and risk management for the PA in the primary care setting. Students will review epidemiology of common infectious diseases and how to prevent or reduce exposure for their patients. This will include how and when to track and report illness or disease, and how to perform a thorough occupational health assessment to determine fitness for duty. Emphasis will be placed on overall risk reduction and patient counseling in prevention of illness or injury. Topics include basic disaster preparedness, infection control and response to outbreaks, occupational medicine, and global health

Offered: every spring.

PAS 654 Medical Microbiology & Infectious Disease 2 Credits

This course is an overview of the morphology, physiology, ecology and replication modes of bacterial microorganisms as well as viruses, and other pathogens associated with human disease. Emphasis is given to mechanisms of pathogenesis used by bacteria and viruses, as well as the means used by humans to prevent or rid the body of microbial agents. This course will supplement knowledge gained in the study of clinical medicine, epidemiology, and pathophysiology in the diagnosis and treatment of infectious medical conditions.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 674 Professional Development IV 2 Credits

This course is the fourth of a series of five courses designed to develop the physician assistant professional. In this course, students will learn more about identifying and interpreting data, how to interview and care for challenging patient, medical informatics/EMR/billing, and complete their OSHA/bloodborne pathogens training in preparation for clerkships. Instructors and guest speakers will expose students to challenging scenarios that require professional interaction to heighten personal awareness and prepare students for recognizing challenges in health care and improving patient outcomes.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 705 Primary Care/Family Medicine Clerkship 4 Credits

Students are exposed to a variety of experiences that emphasize the patient and family as a whole unit from birth to end of life. Students will be involved in providing integrated, accessible health care services, and will be accountable for addressing a majority of personal health care needs, while practicing in the context of the family and community. This will all be competed at with the direct supervision of the primary care preceptor. This will expose students to common health problems in each body system. This rotation may be in a private office or an ambulatory clinic setting. In addition to general routine health maintenance, students will become familiar with common primary care issues. Patient education, counseling and integration with community services are other components of this rotation.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 706 Pediatrics Clerkship 4 Credits

This rotation will encompass all aspects of pediatric care, from birth to adolescence. It will provide the student with opportunities to obtain medical histories and perform pediatric examinations, also stressing diagnosis and management of common childhood illnesses. Evaluation and education of patients and families on normal growth and development will be included, as well as appropriate health maintenance and disease prevention. The student will be well versed in topics such as immunizations, common psychosocial problems, nutrition along with accident and poisoning prevention.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 715 Internal Medicine Outpatient Clerkship 4 Credits

The internal medicine rotation is designed to give students exposure to the spectrum of adult healthcare. The fundamentals of this rotation will place emphasis on the patient evaluation and assessment, oral and written case presentations, understanding the complexities and interrelationships of the disease process, diagnostic and therapeutic collaboration and management of acute illnesses. The navigation through the availability of community services will also be taught to students. This clerkship will take place in an outpatient setting for general internal medicine.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 716 Women’s Health Clerkship 4 Credits

The purpose of this rotation is to learn and understand the basic principles and practice of obstetrics and gynecology, and to develop a general understanding of women’s health. This rotation will encompass diagnosis, treatment and management of common issues encountered in women’s health, emphasis will also be on building knowledge from the internal medicine phase.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 717 Elective Clerkship 4 Credits

Students will have the opportunity, as pre-arranged with a qualified preceptor, to a participate in a rotation of their choice. These rotations may include, critical care ICU, Dermatology, Infectious disease, specialty surgery, specialty pediatrics, cardiology, radiology, orthopedics, pain management, and a return for added knowledge to a previous required rotation.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 725 Internal Medicine Inpatient Clerkship 4 Credits

The internal medicine inpatient rotation provides with student with an inpatient setting experience. The student will become an integral member of the medical team. They will become proficient in gathering medical data, making tentative assessments and plans as they participate in the management of patients on the general medical wards. The preceptor may be a private provider or part of a hospitalist group.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 726 Emergency Medicine Clerkship 4 Credits

The Emergency Medicine rotation combines facets of all specialties, while focusing on acute and critical care management of the patient. The emergency department is often also used as a primary care site in many areas due poor access to care. The student will learn basic concepts of medical triage, and be able to assess different types of emergencies and provide appropriate treatment under the guidance of the preceptor. The student will be expected to participate as a member of the emergency department team in assessment and care of emergent, acute, and sub-acute conditions.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 735 General Surgery Clerkship 4 Credits

The general surgery rotation provides students with an opportunity to apply principles learned that have been taught during the pre-clinical year. This rotation will include supervised visits in both ambulatory and in-patient settings to expose the student to various surgical options. Emphasis will be placed on differential diagnosis, patient management both pre and post operatively, data collection, and performance of diagnostic and therapeutic skills. Students will also learn to triage emergency situations. Students will have the opportunity for health education and counseling. Students will assist the surgeon in the operating arena, and will have the opportunity to become familiar with the operating procedures and management. Students will have prior knowledge of the surgical scrub and operating room techniques during the didactic, clinical skills year. Students will be required to attend any surgical grand rounds and surgically oriented educational meetings that the surgeon deems necessary for education advancement. The emphasis is on general surgery, although students may have exposure to different sub specialties.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 736 Psychiatry/Behavioral Medicine Clerkship 4 Credits

This rotation will teach students to recognize psychiatric illnesses as well as the psychiatric component of other illnesses in such as to effectively address the needs of the patient. Students will be taught how to look beyond the individual and their immediate circumstances to assess related familial and environmental needs which may be contributing to the illness. The student will gain knowledge of the intricacies of psychiatric illnesses through active involvement in the diagnosis and management of the patient. Students will further their understanding of effective patient interactions and the mental health components of health, disability and disease. Students may be placed in either and in-patient facility or outpatient office.

Offered: every fall, spring, & summer.

PAS 737 Palliative Care and End-of Life Considerations 1 Credit

Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach to specialized medical care for people with serious illnesses. This course focuses on training students in providing patients with relief from the symptoms, pain, physical stress, and mental stress of a serious illness. Students will learn differences in palliative and end-of-life care, ethical and legal considerations of this area of medicine, and how to address common barriers to palliative care.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 745 Clerkship Seminar I 1 Credit

Students will return to campus for two days at the end of each clerkship for seminars that include the end-of-rotation exam, grand rounds presentations, and additional professional development lectures/topics. This is also an opportunity to students to meet with their instructors and peers to review any challenging topics faced during clinical clerkships, and access campus resources in the simulation lab for refresher training on the basic sciences. During grand rounds, a small group of pre-selected students will present an interesting or challenging case from their recent clerkship experience and engage the class in discussion about how to manage that case. Professional development topics will include medical ethics, communicating with the challenging patient, interprofessional education, and more. Guest speakers will be invited to speak on various professional topics during this course. Students will also be presented with a medical article for review, critical analysis, and discussion of content.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 746 Clerkship Seminar II 1 Credit

This is a continuation of the clerkship seminars in semester five. Students will return to campus for two days at the end of each clerkship for seminars that include the end-of-rotation exam, grand rounds presentations, and additional professional development lectures/topics. This is also an opportunity to students to meet with their instructors and peers to review any challenging topics faced during clinical clerkships, and access campus resources in the simulation lab for refresher training on the basic sciences. During grand rounds, a small group of pre-selected students will present an interesting or challenging case from their recent clerkship experience and engage the class in discussion about how to manage that case. Professional development topics will include medical ethics, communicating with the challenging patient, interprofessional education, and more. Guest speakers will be invited to speak on various professional topics during this course. Students will also be presented with a medical article for review, critical analysis, and discussion of content.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 747 Clerkship Seminar III 2 Credits

This is a continuation of the clerkship seminars in semester five and six. Students will return to campus for two days at the end of each clerkship for seminars that include the end-of-rotation exam, grand rounds presentations, and additional professional development lectures/topics.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 755 Master’s Research & Writing I 1 Credit

This is the first of two courses related to research and publication for physician assistant studies students. In this course, we focus on 1) reading scientific literature; 2) researching a scientific question; 3) framing a hypothesis; and 4) preparing a study design.

Offered: every summer.

PAS 756 Master’s Research & Writing II 1 Credit

This is the second of two courses related to research and publication for physician assistant studies students. In this course we will focus on scientific writing and editing, including providing summaries of research for both peers and patients; presentation of research, the peer review process, and the publication process.

Offered: every fall.

PAS 777 Professional Development V 2 Credits

This course is the final in a series of five courses designed to develop the physician assistant professional. In this course, students will learn more about licensure and credentialing, contract negotiation, and CV writing in preparation for entering the profession. Instructors and guest speakers will be invited to work with students in this area including speakers from human resources, career development, and a few of our largest local employers.

Offered: every spring.

PAS 799 Capstone Seminar 2 Credits

This course provides students with the opportunity to demonstrate that they have achieved the goals, objectives, and competencies of the program and are prepared to enter the workforce as competent and caring physician assistant. Students will have an intensive 3-day PANCE Prep Course, complete the summative assessments (Written, OSCE, Professional Skills), submit their scientific research and writing presentation, and complete the final program evaluation/exit survey.

Offered: every spring.