Core Curriculum

Core Curriculum Mission

The Canisius College Core Curriculum is rooted in the humanistic ideals of the Catholic intellectual tradition and Jesuit pedagogy with its emphases on academic excellence, the dialogue of faith and reason, and service to humanity.

The Core Curriculum seeks to provide Canisius students with a strong foundation in the humanities and liberal arts as the first step in a transformative experience that will expose them to the richness of human diversity and infuse them with a sense of service in the cause of justice for all peoples, but especially for the poor and marginalized of the world.

At the same time, the Core Curriculum seeks to develop student skills in writing, oral communication, information literacy, and critical thinking that are essential for success in life regardless of the profession one chooses to pursue.

Lastly, the Core Curriculum seeks to engage Canisius students with the spiritual dimension of human life in the hope that this will enable them to seek God in all things and to become men and women for and with others in the pursuit of wisdom and magnanimity.

More information about the core is available on the Academic Affairs Website.

Core Capstone

The Core Curriculum includes a Core Capstone that provides students an opportunity to reflect upon the meaning and significance of the Core Curriculum. Students should ideally take the Core Capstone upon completion of all the other core components, usually in the junior or senior year.

Core Curriculum Experiences

  1. Foundation Courses: Four courses — FYS 101, ENG 101, PHI 101, RST 101
    Students are encouraged to complete these four foundation courses during their first year and as their major schedules permit. Usually FYS 101 is taken during the fall semester and ENG 101 during the spring semester. First-year students should complete PHI 101 or RST 101 during the fall semester and then the other course during the spring semester.
  2. Breadth of Knowledge: minimum seven courses
    Students take at least seven courses that range over the traditional liberal arts, at least one from each of the following Fields: Religious Studies, Philosophy, Literature and the Arts, History, Social Sciences, Natural Sciences, and Mathematical Sciences. Only courses having the appropriate field-designation satisfy this component of the Core Curriculum.
  3. Cross-disciplinary Knowledge and Skills Courses: courses having the following six designations
    Students also take courses that satisfy the following cross-disciplinary knowledge and skills goals: Justice, Ethics, Diversity, Global Awareness, Advanced Writing-intensive, and Oral Communication. Courses with an appropriate field-designation or courses that satisfy major or elective credits may also have these designations. Students take as many courses as necessary to complete the knowledge and skills goals.
  4. Core Capstone: One designated course or experience
    Ideally after students complete all other Core Curriculum expectations, they become eligible for the Core Capstone. Typically this occurs during a student’s junior or senior year. Some Core Capstones might also be capstones in a major (see your major course of study for such overlap).

Descriptions of Core Curriculum Components

The Core Curriculum is a multi-disciplinary program of study that all Canisius College students experience. The Core Curriculum components include:

  1. Foundation Courses
    The Core Curriculum provides a foundation of four common courses, usually completed during the first year. These courses include basic instruction in writing (FYS 101, ENG 101), attention to the process of critical thinking through the basic development of information literacy (FYS 101, ENG 101, PHI 101, RST 101), and a basic understanding of the importance of studying religion and philosophy within the Catholic, Jesuit tradition of education (PHI 101, RST 101).
    • Foundation FYS 101: Explorations of Academic Writing — Special Topics
      This course emphasizes the production of academic writing through critical analysis of texts with topics drawn from a wide range of academic disciplines. These courses are intended to be seminar style with reading and discussion appropriately challenging for first-year students. The motivating goal is that students learn to write to enhance learning, find and evaluate information, practice academic integrity, negotiate the process of revision, and use correct grammar and syntax.
    • Foundation ENG 101: Writing about Literature
      This course develops strategies for reading and writing about literature — poetry, drama, fiction, literary essays. The motivating goal is that students come to understand and interpret primary literary texts, develop writing skills, and develop and organize interpretive essays through the use and evaluation of sources. ENG 101 courses have a significant component devoted to writing instruction and developing information literacy. Students undertake appropriate research activities, write at least 15 pages of polished prose, and revise their writing exercises.
    • Foundation PHI 101: Introduction to Philosophy
      This course acknowledges the special place of philosophy in Catholic Jesuit education. PHI 101 provides a thoughtful examination of philosophical issues, with concern that students learn to use logical and critical analysis to understand the claims and arguments proposed by classical and modern philosophers, including some in the Catholic philosophical tradition.
    • Foundation RST 101: Introduction to Religious Studies
      This course acknowledges the special place of studying religion in Catholic Jesuit education. RST 101 provides an academic introduction to religion, with a concern that students understand the nature and role of religion and religious experience in human life and society, including the Jesuit and Catholic traditions as well as other world religions.
  2. Breadth of Knowledge
    The Core Curriculum compasses a distribution of liberal arts and sciences courses, one in each of seven Breadth of Knowledge Fields. These courses provide a broad examination of the liberal arts tradition and invite participants to recognize the multiple ways that natural and social phenomena have been studied and categorized. The skills and knowledge students develop through the Breadth of Knowledge component of the Core Curriculum reflect the variety of disciplinary norms specific to each Field. Taken together these courses encourage students to reflect on their inner lives, to consider how attention to the life of the mind bears upon reality, and to discern the human relationship to the natural world and to social institutions.
    The seven Breadth of Knowledge Fields are:
    • Field 1: Religious Studies and Theology
      Filed 1 courses enable students to gain a clearer understanding of the role that religion plays in human life through a careful and systematic examination of religious ideas, institutions, values, or patterns of belief and practice.
    • Field 2: Philosophy
      Field 2 courses enable students to understand, articulate, and evaluate the values, principles, and assumptions on which individual and social decisions rest.
    • Field 3: Literature and the Arts
      Field 3 courses enable students to understand the aesthetic dimension of creative work in the fine arts and/or literature and to articulate how that creative work mirrors and shapes human experience.
    • Field 4: History
      Field 4 courses enable students to understand how historians use evidence to study the recorded past, to situate events, artifacts, and experiences in their historical context, and to analyze the process of change over time.
    • Field 5: Social Sciences
      Field 5 courses enable students to explain, interpret, and critically analyze human behavior and social structures from the perspective of the social sciences and their methods.
    • Field 6: Natural Sciences
      Field 6 courses enable students to explain, interpret, and critically analyze the natural world using the scientific method from the perspectives of the various natural sciences.
    • Field 7: Mathematical Sciences
      Field 7 courses enable students to reason quantitatively, abstractly, or computationally about the world using the symbol systems rooted in quantitative measures, logical analysis, and/or algorithms to solve practical problems.
  3. Cross-Disciplinary Knowledge and Skills courses
    The Core Curriculum provides six focal areas that address matters central to the Catholic, Jesuit tradition of education that are necessary for preparing students for the modern world. Students select courses to fulfill all six experiences. Any course may carry a Cross-Disciplinary Knowledge or Skill designation that has a significant component on the focal area. Such courses may also satisfy Field and major requirements as well as elective credit.
    • Diversity Component
      Courses with a diversity component enable students to develop an understanding of the multicultural character of the United States by giving attention to the cultural differences within the United States. This focal concern is grounded on the assumption that a good education ought to provide students with the intellectual tools and broad perspectives for examining their own communities and values as well as the communities and values of other peoples.
    • Ethics Component
      Courses with an ethics component enable students to develop an understanding of personal action, the good in terms of human agency and happiness and living a worthwhile life. Attention focuses on moral issues, living well and the frameworks that make living well intelligible, both personally and professionally. This focal concern is grounded on the assumption that an understanding of ethics is an integral part of educating the whole person for good citizenship.
    • Global Awareness Component
      Courses with a global awareness component enable students to develop an awareness of nations, countries, regions, communities and cultures outside of the United States. This focal concern is grounded on the assumption that we live in an increasingly interconnected world, and that a liberal arts education ought to provide students the intellectual tools and understandings to comprehend global events.
    • Justice Component
      Courses with a justice component enable students to develop an understanding of the nature of justice, including the tension between justice and power, as well as the causes of injustice. This focal concern is grounded on the assumption that we live in a world that increasingly calls to its citizens to promote justice and that a liberal arts education ought to provide students the intellectual tools and understandings to promote justice.
    • Advanced Writing-intensive Component
      Courses at the 200-level or above with an advanced writing component provide significant emphasis on using writing as a way to learn. The focal concern is that students participate in the process of drafting, re-writing, and editing at an advanced level, with extensive commentary and assistance from instructors.
    • Oral Communication Component
      Courses with an oral communication component enable students to develop abilities to communicate effectively and appropriately in a range of contexts, including face-to-face engagements and through practicing their skills with sending and receiving messages. Effective communication helps maintain a sense of community as well as an ability to craft consensus in an increasingly diverse and complex world. Preparation for life in the modern world requires sensitive and skillful communication with those of widely different backgrounds, cultural experiences, and values.

Courses in the Core Curriculum

Foundations

Students must take each of the following classes:
FYS 101Explorations of Academic Writing and Special Topics3
ENG 101Writing about Literature3
PHI 101Introduction to Philosophy3
RST 101Introduction to Religious Studies and Theology3

Field 1 (Religious Studies and Theology)

Students must take one of the following classes:
CLS 308Pagans and Christians3
CLS 309Greek and Roman Religion3
HIS 302Life and Theology in Colonial Atlantic3
HIS 306American Religious Experience3
IGSR 300Immersion East Side Seminar3
IGSR 302Jesuits in Argentina3
PSY 230Psychology of Religion3
RST 200Introduction to the Hebrew Bible3
RST 201Introduction to the New Testament3
RST 219History of Eastern Orthodox Christianity3
RST 220Introduction to Eastern Religions3
RST 221Native American Religions3
RST 222African Religions3
RST 224Islam: Tradition and Revival3
RST 229Religious Perspectives on Animals3
RST 230Catholic Belief Today3
RST 231Introduction to Catholic Studies3
RST 234Christians (En) Countering Injustice3
RST 235Religion and Politics3
RST 236Theology and European Film3
RST 237Images of Jesus in Film and Art3
RST 240Development of Jewish Religious Thought and Practice3
RST 242Introduction to the Spirituality of Business3
RST 314New Testament in Literature and Art3
RST 324Biblical Archaeology3
RST 325Early Christianity3
RST 327Modern Global Christianity3
RST 340Moral Issues Today3
RST 341Catholic Social Ethics: Theological Perspectives3
RST 342Theological Ethics and Environmental Justice3
RST 343Franciscan Reply to Science3
RST 345Bio-Moral Problems3
RST 353Seven Signs of Love3
RST 355The Problem of Suffering3
RST 360Magic, Science and Religion3
RST 400Religious Studies and Theology Seminar3

Field 2 (Philosophy)

Students must take one of the following classes:
CLS 312The Greek Enlightenment3
HIS 347The History of Marxism3
HIS 348Twentieth Century Marxism3
PHI 225Logic3
PHI 240Justice3
PHI 241Ethics: Traditions in Moral Reasoning3
PHI 242Ethical Issues in Business3
PHI 243Bio-Medical Ethics3
PHI 244Environmental Ethics3
PHI 245Animal Ethics3
PHI 246Ethics of Technology3
PHI 247Food and Agricultural Ethics3
PHI 252Happiness, Virtue and the Good Life3
PHI 261Philosophy of Law3
PHI 264Justice & the Environment: The Problem of Climate Change3
PHI 267Catholic Social Thought3
PHI 271Philosophy of Human Rights3
PHI 272Gender and Philosophy3
PHI 273Race and Philosophy3
PHI 274Social and Political Philosophy3
PHI 285Black Philosophy3
PHI 286Latin American Philosophy3
PHI 291Philosophy of Art3
PHI 292Philosophy of Beauty3

Field 3 (Literature and the Arts)

Students must take one of the following classes:
CLS 205Mirror of the Past: Greece3
CLS 206Mirror of the Past: Rome3
CLS 207Mythology and Literature3
CLS 214Greek and Roman Tragedy3
CLS 301The Age of Cicero3
DMA 201Introduction to Digital Media3
DMA 2133D Graphics3
DMA 214Digital Design Concepts3
DMA 310Digital Audio/Music Production3
ENG 147Acting I3
ENG 148Acting II3
ENG 201Poetry3
ENG 202Drama3
ENG 211Science Fiction3
ENG 213Word and Image3
ENG 218Literature and Medicine3
ENG 219Literature and Psychology3
ENG 220Contemporary Catholic Fiction3
ENG 223Images of Women in Literature and Film3
ENG 224The Journey in World Literature3
ENG 225The Journey in American Literature3
ENG 233The Quest in Medieval Literature3
ENG 285Animals in Film and Literature3
ENG 294Introduction to Creative Writing3
ENG 368Native American Literature3
ENG 369Contemporary American Fiction3
ENG 382African American Literature3
ENG 411Playwriting3
FAH 101Cave Paintings, the Colosseum & Cathedrals3
FAH 102Altarpieces, Academies & the Avant-Garde3
FAH 103Survey of Pre-Columbian and Native American Art3
FAH 107Introduction to African and Asian Art3
FAH 109History of Architecture3
FAH 110History of Photography3
FAH 159Gender and Art3
FAH 210Ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern Art3
FAH 213Greek and Roman Art3
FAH 224Medieval Art3
FAH 245Renaissance Art3
FAH 248Baroque Art3
FAH 261Monet and the Age of Impressionism3
FAH 262Modern Art3
FAH 265Contemporary Art3
FAH 266Modern Architecture3
FAH 267Frank Lloyd Wright3
FAH 271Art in Buffalo3
FAM 115Fundamentals of Music3
FAM 119Masterpieces of Music3
FAM 123World Musics3
FAM 124America's Music3
FAM 212Canisius and the BPO Experience3
FAM 213Women in Music3
FAM 214Music in Film3
FAM 216Medieval and Renaissance Music3
FAM 217Music of the Baroque Period3
FAM 218Music of the Classical Period3
FAM 21919th Century Music3
FAM 220Art Music from 1900 to the Present3
FAM 221Opera Workshop I3
FAM 222Opera Workshop II3
FAM 224Afro-Centric Music3
FAM 230Music Theory I3
FAM 255Diction for Singers3
FAS 110Two-Dimensional Design3
FAS 120Drawing I3
FAS 130Three-Dimensional Design3
FAS 131Sculpture I3
FAS 140Introduction to Still Photography3
FAS 141Digital Photography3
FAS 150Color3
FAS 160Printmaking I3
FAS 170Studio Painting I3
FAS 222Figure Drawing I3
HIS 387Representations of the Holocaust in Film, Literature, Art and Music3

Field 4 (History)

Students must take one of the following classes:
CLS 103Greek History3
CLS 104Roman History3
EVST 259Environmental History of the United States3
HIS 106The Medieval World3
HIS 107History of Modern Europe to 18153
HIS 108History of Modern Europe since 18153
HIS 109History of Asia to 18003
HIS 110History of Asia Since 18003
HIS 123History of the United States: The Colonial Period to Reconstruction3
HIS 124History of the United States: 1877 to the Present3
HIS 125America's Story I: The Early Years3
HIS 126America's Story II: The Later Years3
HIS 131Latin American History to 18303
HIS 132Latin American History since 18303
HIS 201United States Military History3
HIS 203Castles, Bones and Battleaxes: Material Culture of the Medieval World3
HIS 204Soccer in Global History3
HIS 211Women In The Western World3
HIS 212Men and Ideas in History3
HIS 213Twentieth Century Europe3
HIS 220The History of Food3
HIS 226History of Ireland3
HIS 229The Violent Century in Films3
HIS 230The Holocaust in Historical Perspective3
HIS 235From Jamestown to Yorktown: Making the United States3
HIS 236From Washington to Lincoln: The Making of American Democracy3
HIS 237The Making of Modern America 1865-19203
HIS 251Sports in America3
HIS 254First Peoples3
HIS 260Canada and the World3
HIS 263Wars of Latin America3
HIS 280The Making of Modern Africa3
PSC 111Western Political Tradition3

Field 5 (Social Sciences)

Students must take one of the following classes:
ANT 122Sociocultural Anthropology3
ANT 230Introduction to Archaeology3
ATH 361Psychology of Sport and Mental Health3
CLS 209Greek and Roman Archaeology3
CLS 300Roman Law and Society3
COM 204Interpersonal Communication3
COM 205Mass Communication and Society3
COM 304Family Communication3
COM 350Health Communication3
CRJ 227Criminal Justice I3
DMA 215Digital Media Culture3
ECO 101Principles of Macroeconomics3
ECO 102Principles of Microeconomics3
EDE 100Human Growth and Development - Birth through Childhood3
EDS 101Human Growth and Social Development: Adolescence3
EVST 250Nature, Culture and Interpretation3
EVST 275Global Environmental Problems3
HED 361Psychology of Sport and Mental Health3
HSV 301Social Policies3
PSC 103The American Constitution3
PSC 104American Political Process3
PSC 140International Relations3
PSC 150Comparative Government and Politics3
PSC 224Congress and the Legislative Process3
PSC 241Human Rights and Globalization3
PSC 242International Organizations3
PSC 320American Constitutional Law I3
PSC 321American Constitutional Law II3
PSC 336Urban Government and Politics3
PSC 345Transnational Crime After 9/113
PSC 355European Union3
PSC 370Domestic Conflicts & Peace3
SOC 110Introduction to Sociology3
SOC 111Contemporary Social Problems3
SOC 234Environment and Society3
SOC 273Social Movements and Social Change3
SOC 291Gender and Society3
SOC 341Race and Ethnic Relations3
SPMT 320Psychology of Sport3
WST 201Introduction to Women and Gender Studies3

Field 6 (Natural Sciences)

Students must take one of the following classes:
ANT 121Biological Anthropology3
BIO 109Nutrition3
BIO 111Introductory Biology I3
BIO 114Human Biology: Introduction to Human Anatomy and Physiology3
BIO 116Disease: Myth and Reality3
BIO 120Biology in the News3
BIO 125Microbes and People3
BIO 131Biotechology and Society3
BIO 132Genes and People3
BIO 150Animal Nutrition3
BIO 166Biology of Birds3
BIO 221Biology of Women3
CHM 104Energy, Environment, and Society3
CHM 109General Chemistry I with Review - Part I3
CHM 111General Chemistry I3
CHM 112General Chemistry II3-4
EVST 110Science of Environmental Problems I3
EVST 111Science of Environmental Problems II3
GEO 325Introduction to Physical Geography3
GEOL 120Introductory Geology3
PHY 129Introduction to Astronomy3
PHY 131Earthquakes: Seismology and Society3
PHY 133Dinosaurs3
PHY 201College Physics I3
PHY 223General Physics for Physical Science Majors I3

Field 7 (Mathematical Sciences)

Students must take one of the following classes:
ATH 398Statistics and Research Design3
CSC 108Introduction to Web Computing3
CSC 109Robotics Introduction to Computer Science3
CSC 109LRobotics Introduction to Computer Science Laboratory1
CSC 111Introduction to Programming3
CSC 127Introduction to Game Design3
MAT 105Finite Mathematics3
MAT 106Calculus for the Non-Sciences3
MAT 108Precalculus for Sciences3
MAT 109Calculus with Review I4
MAT 111Calculus I4
MAT 115Calculus for Business4
MAT 121Mathematics through History3
MAT 131Statistics for Social Sciences3
MAT 141Inferential Statistics and Computers for Science4
MAT 150Mathematics and Politics3
MAT 161Mathematics for Elementary Teachers3

Advanced Writing-Intensive

Students must take one of the following classes (note that many of these courses also fulfill one of the Breadth of Knowledge Fields):
ABEC 332Animal Welfare3
ABEC 340Research Methods in Animal Behavior3
ABEC 360Observational Research Methods4
ANT 341Environmental Anthropology3
ANT 350Business Anthropology3
ANT 355Sociolinguistics3
BCH 403LMolecular Biology Laboratory1
BIF 400Bioinformatics Senior Seminar3
BIO 312Primatology3
BIO 404LGenetics Laboratory1
CHM 301LClassical Physical Chemistry Laboratory1
CLS 301The Age of Cicero3
COM 203Writing for the Public Media3
CRJ 320Criminology3
EDS 223Foundations of Adolescent Literacy3
EDU 415Grammar and Language Study for Teachers3
ENG 201Poetry3
ENG 202Drama3
ENG 205Varieties of the Essay3
ENG 218Literature and Medicine3
ENG 219Literature and Psychology3
ENG 223Images of Women in Literature and Film3
ENG 224The Journey in World Literature3
ENG 225The Journey in American Literature3
ENG 233The Quest in Medieval Literature3
ENG 285Animals in Film and Literature3
ENG 294Introduction to Creative Writing3
ENG 383Reseach Writing: Process and Product3
ENG 385Persuasive Writing3
ENG 389Business Communication3
ENG 411Playwriting3
FAH 350Topics in Art History3
HIS 299Historian's Craft3
HIS 411History Honors Thesis3
PED 372Seminar in Kinesiology3
PHY 350Modern Physics Laboratory1
PHY 449Nuclear Physics Lab1
PSC 242International Organizations3
PSC 370Domestic Conflicts & Peace3
RST 230Catholic Belief Today3
RST 231Introduction to Catholic Studies3
RST 341Catholic Social Ethics: Theological Perspectives3
SPMT 480Research Methods in Sport3

Oral Communication

Students must take one of the following classes (note that many of these courses also fulfill one of the Breadth of Knowledge Fields):
BIO 353Biology Seminar II1
CHM 481Communicating Research Literature1
CLS 214Greek and Roman Tragedy3
CLS 300Roman Law and Society3
CLS 309Greek and Roman Religion3
COM 201Oral Communication3
COM 319Training and Development3
CRJ 280Language for Legal Professions3
CSC 127Introduction to Game Design3
CSC 395Software Engineering3
EDE 432Seminar in Teaching and Assessment3
EDS 432Applied Methods of Teaching English: Adolescence3
EDS 433Applied Methods of Teaching Mathematics: Adolescence3
EDS 434Applied Methods of Teaching Modern Languages: Adolescence3
EDS 435Applied Methods of Teaching Science: Adolescence3
EDS 436Applied Methods of Teaching Social Studies3
ENG 147Acting I3
ENG 148Acting II3
ENG 350The Theater Experience3
ENT 101Experiential Entrepreneurship: Creativity, Innovation, Opportunity, and Idea Generation3
ESL 118The Art of Oral Presentations3
FAH 210Ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern Art3
FAH 213Greek and Roman Art3
FAH 450Senior Seminar3
FAM 450Senior Seminar3
HIS 125America's Story I: The Early Years3
HIS 126America's Story II: The Later Years3
HIS 331British Monarchy3
MAT 480Mathematics Seminar1
MLS 201Foundations of Leadership3
MLS 401Mission Command and the Army Profession3
MLS 402Mission Command and the Company Grade Officer3
PED 441Teaching Methods in Physical Education3
PHY 351Advanced Laboratory1
PSC 224Congress and the Legislative Process3
PSC 355European Union3
RST 235Religion and Politics3
RST 342Theological Ethics and Environmental Justice3
SPE 432Seminar in Teaching and Assessment3
SPMT 430Sport Communications3

Global Awareness

Students must take one of the following classes (note that many of these courses also fulfill one of the Breadth of Knowledge Fields):
ANT 122Sociocultural Anthropology3
ANT 230Introduction to Archaeology3
ANT 341Environmental Anthropology3
ANT 350Business Anthropology3
CLS 103Greek History3
CLS 104Roman History3
CLS 205Mirror of the Past: Greece3
CLS 206Mirror of the Past: Rome3
CLS 209Greek and Roman Archaeology3
CLS 308Pagans and Christians3
CLS 309Greek and Roman Religion3
CLS 311Alexander the Great3
ECO 460International Trade3
ENG 224The Journey in World Literature3
ENG 381Postcolonial Literature3
FAH 101Cave Paintings, the Colosseum & Cathedrals3
FAH 102Altarpieces, Academies & the Avant-Garde3
FAH 107Introduction to African and Asian Art3
FAH 109History of Architecture3
FAH 110History of Photography3
FAH 159Gender and Art3
FAH 210Ancient Egyptian and Near Eastern Art3
FAH 224Medieval Art3
FAH 245Renaissance Art3
FAH 248Baroque Art3
FAH 261Monet and the Age of Impressionism3
FAH 262Modern Art3
FAH 265Contemporary Art3
FAH 266Modern Architecture3
FAM 119Masterpieces of Music3
FAM 123World Musics3
FAM 212Canisius and the BPO Experience3
FAM 216Medieval and Renaissance Music3
FAM 217Music of the Baroque Period3
FAM 218Music of the Classical Period3
FAM 21919th Century Music3
FAM 224Afro-Centric Music3
HIS 106The Medieval World3
HIS 107History of Modern Europe to 18153
HIS 108History of Modern Europe since 18153
HIS 109History of Asia to 18003
HIS 110History of Asia Since 18003
HIS 131Latin American History to 18303
HIS 132Latin American History since 18303
HIS 211Women In The Western World3
HIS 213Twentieth Century Europe3
HIS 220The History of Food3
HIS 226History of Ireland3
HIS 260Canada and the World3
HIS 263Wars of Latin America3
HIS 280The Making of Modern Africa3
MAT 121Mathematics through History3
MKT 375International Marketing3
PED 203Net, Target and Fitness Activities3
PED 204Invasion Games3
PHY 131Earthquakes: Seismology and Society3
PSC 140International Relations3
PSC 150Comparative Government and Politics3
PSC 241Human Rights and Globalization3
PSC 242International Organizations3
PSC 345Transnational Crime After 9/113
PSC 355European Union3
RST 200Introduction to the Hebrew Bible3
RST 219History of Eastern Orthodox Christianity3
RST 220Introduction to Eastern Religions3
RST 222African Religions3
RST 224Islam: Tradition and Revival3
RST 360Magic, Science and Religion3
SPMT 440Global Perspective in Sport3

Justice

Students must take one of the following classes (note that many of these courses also fulfill one of the Breadth of Knowledge Fields):
ABEC 330Animals, Public Policy, and the Law3
CLS 300Roman Law and Society3
CRJ 280Language for Legal Professions3
CRJ 320Criminology3
EDU 250Foundations of Education3
HIS 201United States Military History3
HIS 347The History of Marxism3
HIS 350America and the Holocaust3
IGSR 300Immersion East Side Seminar3
IGSR 302Jesuits in Argentina3
IGSR 306Faith/Justice/Globalism in Phi3
MAT 150Mathematics and Politics3
PHI 240Justice3
PHI 261Philosophy of Law3
PHI 264Justice & the Environment: The Problem of Climate Change3
PHI 267Catholic Social Thought3
PHI 271Philosophy of Human Rights3
PHI 272Gender and Philosophy3
PHI 273Race and Philosophy3
PHI 274Social and Political Philosophy3
PHI 286Latin American Philosophy3
PSC 111Western Political Tradition3
PSC 320American Constitutional Law I3
PSC 321American Constitutional Law II3
RST 234Christians (En) Countering Injustice3
RST 235Religion and Politics3
RST 341Catholic Social Ethics: Theological Perspectives3
RST 353Seven Signs of Love3
SOC 273Social Movements and Social Change3

Ethics

Students must take one of the following classes (note that many of these courses also fulfill one of the Breadth of Knowledge Fields):
CLS 207Mythology and Literature3
CLS 214Greek and Roman Tragedy3
COM 351Media Ethics3
CRJ 382Criminal Justice Ethics3
CSC 108Introduction to Web Computing3
CSC 109LRobotics Introduction to Computer Science Laboratory1
HIS 348Twentieth Century Marxism3
HIS 387Representations of the Holocaust in Film, Literature, Art and Music3
HSV 301Social Policies3
PHI 241Ethics: Traditions in Moral Reasoning3
PHI 242Ethical Issues in Business3
PHI 243Bio-Medical Ethics3
PHI 244Environmental Ethics3
PHI 245Animal Ethics3
PHI 246Ethics of Technology3
PHI 247Food and Agricultural Ethics3
PHI 252Happiness, Virtue and the Good Life3
RST 242Introduction to the Spirituality of Business3
RST 340Moral Issues Today3
RST 342Theological Ethics and Environmental Justice3
RST 343Franciscan Reply to Science3
RST 345Bio-Moral Problems3
SPMT 302Sport and Ethics3

Diversity

Students must take one of the following classes (note that many of these courses also fulfill one of the Breadth of Knowledge Fields):
ENG 225The Journey in American Literature3
ENG 315American Literature I3
ENG 339Southern Literature3
ENG 368Native American Literature3
ENG 382African American Literature3
FAH 103Survey of Pre-Columbian and Native American Art3
FAM 124America's Music3
FAM 213Women in Music3
HIS 123History of the United States: The Colonial Period to Reconstruction3
HIS 124History of the United States: 1877 to the Present3
HIS 125America's Story I: The Early Years3
HIS 126America's Story II: The Later Years3
HIS 235From Jamestown to Yorktown: Making the United States3
HIS 236From Washington to Lincoln: The Making of American Democracy3
HIS 237The Making of Modern America 1865-19203
HIS 254First Peoples3
PED 354Adapted Physical Education3
PED 355Disability Sports3
SOC 111Contemporary Social Problems3
SPE 341Inclusive Strategies3

Core Capstone

Students must take one of the following classes:
ABEC 404Wildlife Ecology and Conservation in South Africa3
ABEC 419Anthrozoology3
BIO 477Plants and Society3
CLL 400Humanitas3
COM 414Issues in Integrated Marketing Communications3
CSC 320The Social Impact of Computing3
DMA 399Social Documentary3
DMA 493Video Institute III3
DMA 494Video Institute IV3
ECCH 494Capstone Seminar for Teacher Candidates3
EDE 494Capstone Seminar for Teacher Candidates3
EDS 494Capstone Seminar for Adolescence Education Teacher Candidates1-3
EDY 494Capstone Seminar for Teacher Candidates3
ENG 365English Core Capstone3
FAH 481The Art of the Selfie3
FAM 390Sounding Society3
HIS 414Black Lives Matter3
HIS 421Nature and the Arts of Angling, Restoration, and Contemplation3
HIS 450America and the Holocaust3
HIS 460The Life and Times of Theodore Roosevelt3
HIS 470American Women in History and Literature3
HSV 480Wellness - Be All That You Can Be3
KIN 494Capstone in Kinesiology3
MAT 345Climate and Sustainability3
PHI 399Ethics, Justice, & the Problem of Poverty3
PSC 442Seminar in International Relations3
PSC 452Politics of Identity in Europe3
PSY 320Cultural Psychology3
PSY 365Psychology of Aging3
PSY 470Controversial Issues3
RST 390Christian Marriage3
RST 391Religious Diversity in Buffalo3
RST 392Liberation Theologies3
RST 393Catholic Concept of Conscience3

CORE CURRICULUM LEARNING GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

Courses in the Core Curriculum must meet the following learning goals. Courses may have more learning goals and objectives in addition to those associated with the Core.

Foundations

Foundation FYS 101:  Explore Academic Writing

Content

Goal 1: Read college-level texts pertaining to an academic discipline or topic

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A): recognize the audience and purpose of selected texts within an academic discipline or topic
  • (1B): articulate the meaning of text passages within an academic discipline or topic

Skills

Goal 2: Construct a coherent, thesis-driven paper on an academic topic

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A): develop the ability to write a clear introduction that frames the academic topic
  • (2B): demonstrate appropriate conventions of grammar and style for formal writing
  • (2C): articulate a central thesis around which the paper is to be organized
  • (2D): organize the paper effectively with coherent paragraphs
  • (2E): support the thesis with evidence
  • (2F): conclude the paper appropriately for the topic

Goal 3: Develop basic Information Literacy skills

Objectives: Students will:

  • (3A): locate and evaluate print and/or electronic sources appropriate for answering a particular research question
  • (3B): cite sources according to a conventional documentation style (for example, MLA, APA, Chicago) and with academic integrity

Foundation ENG 101: Writing about Literature

Content

Goal: Students will demonstrate the ability to understand and critically analyze college-level literary texts.

Objectives:  Students will:

  • (1A)  Understand the use of specific literary terms, traditions, or styles
  • (1B)  Interpret the meanings or significance of a literary text

Skills

Goal:  Students will demonstrate the ability to construct a coherent, thesis-driven essay on a literary topic.

Objectives:  Students will

  • (2A) Identify and articulate a central thesis around which the essay is to be organized
  • (2B) Develop a coherent argument that supports a central thesis
  • (2C) Support argument with evidence from literary texts and/or secondary sources
  • (2D) Find and evaluate print and electronic sources appropriate for answering a specific research question about a literary text.
  • (2E) Cite sources according to MLA documentation style and with academic integrity
  • (2F) Demonstrate appropriate conventions of grammar and style

Foundation RST 101: Introduction to Religious Studies

Content

Goal:  Students will demonstrate a basic understanding of the nature and role of religion, including Catholic and Jesuit traditions and other world religions.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Demonstrate basic knowledge of Christianity, Judaism & another world religion, as determined by the instructor

  • (1B) Identify and explain the basic meaning of Catholic beliefs

  • (1C) Identify the key religious terms in the Jesuit tradition

Skills

Goal:  Students will demonstrate their knowledge of religious studies or theology in comparative and reflective exercises.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Identify & analyze connections between different religious beliefs

  • (2B) Find, use and evaluate information relevant to presenting and defending a thesis

  • (2C) Identify and apply the ethical use of academic standards for using sources

Foundation PHI 101: Introduction to Philosophy

Content

Goal:  Students will demonstrate knowledge of major figures and major themes within the history of philosophy.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Demonstrate knowledge of at leastone major figurefrom three of the four eras in the history of philosophy: Ancient, Medieval, Modern, and Contemporary

  • (1B) Demonstrate a basic understanding of some of the major themes in the history of philosophy, from four of the following six areas: Aesthetics, Epistemology, Theories of Ethics, Logic, Metaphysics, and Theories of Justice

  • (1C) Demonstrate knowledge of a primary philosophical text from the Catholic tradition or a significant aspect of the Jesuit tradition

Skills

Goal:  Students will demonstrate the ability to construct and analyze philosophical arguments.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Construct and explain cogent philosophical arguments

  • (2B) Clarify and analyze claims made in philosophical texts

Breadth of Knowledge Fields

Field 1 (Religious Studies and Theology)

Content

Goal:  Students will demonstrate knowledge in the disciplines fundamentally concerned with religious studies or theology.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Understand the role of religion in the experiences and actions of human life.
  • (1B) Understand religious ideas and religious values in their relationship to religious institutions.
  • (1C) Understand the diversity of patterns of religious belief in the human experience.

Skills

Goal:  Students will demonstrate the skills that will enable them to become critical thinkers on questions of religious substance.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Demonstrate competence in the use and analysis of primary sources.
  • (2B) Demonstrate the ability to understand and explain religious concepts.
  • (2C) Demonstrate the ability to relate course subject matter to the human experience.

Field 2 (Philosophy)

Content

Goal: Students will demonstrate a deepened knowledge of a principle theme and a major era or core figure in the history of philosophy.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Demonstrate knowledge of a major topic or branch in the history of philosophy such as Aesthetics, Epistemology, Ethics, Logic, Metaphysics, and Theories of Justice.
  • (1B) Demonstrate knowledge of a major era in the history of philosophy (Ancient, Modern, Medieval, or Contemporary) or a core figure in the history of philosophy.

Skills

Goal: Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate and assess philosophical ideas and arguments.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Use philosophical terms and language appropriately in their prose.
  • (2B) Identify and analyze assumptions and premises in philosophical arguments.
  • (2C) Construct philosophical arguments and write cogently about philosophy.
  • (2D) Demonstrate the ability to relate abstract theory to concrete practice.

Field 3 (Literature and the Arts)

Content

Goal: Students will demonstrate an understanding of the aesthetic dimension of human life through the study of literature, art, or music and the ways in which they mirror and shape the human experience.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Identify specific techniques, styles, or formalistic properties of particular examples of literature, art, or music.
  • (1B) Identify the relationship of particular examples of literature, art, or music to the traditions from which they have emerged.
  • (1C) Demonstrate an understanding of how creative work in literature, art, or music mirrors and shapes human experience.

Skills

Goal: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the methods of literary and artistic criticism and interpretation.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Critically evaluate the methods of literary and/or artistic criticism and interpretation employed in the study of literature, art, or music.
  • (2B) Employ the methods of literary and/or artistic criticism and interpretation in the study of literature, art, or music.

Field 4 (History)

Goal:  Students will demonstrate familiarity with the way in which historians analyze change and continuity over time with reference to specific historical events, themes, ideas, and/or individuals.

Objectives:  Students will:

  • (1A) Situate events, people, and/or artifacts in their appropriate historical context.
  • (1B) Recognize the relationship between cause and effect in the process of historical change.
  • (1C) Read and interpret evidence from primary sources and texts.
  • (1D) Read and understand scholarly historical arguments and the way in which they are constructed.

Field 5 (Social Sciences)

Content

Goal: Students will demonstrate knowledge of human behavior from the perspective of a social science discipline.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Demonstrate knowledge of the basic concepts and theories of a social science discipline.
  • (1B) Demonstrate knowledge of research methodologies used in a social science discipline.

Skills

Goal: Students will utilize a social science discipline to critically evaluate social, cultural, and/or political claims.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Apply social science concepts and theories to concrete problems of human society.
  • (2B) Apply qualitative or quantitative analysis to situations in the world.

Field 6 (Natural Sciences)

Content

Goal:  Students will demonstrate through explanations, interpretations, and critical analyses their understanding of natural phenomena.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Demonstrate valid application of cause and effect reasoning.
  • (1B) Describe patterns of scale, proportion and quantity in the natural world.
  • (1C) Define natural systems in terms of energy, material components and processes of change.

Skills  

Goal: Students will demonstrate the ability to reason and communicate so that their actions can have positive impacts on society. 

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Communicate scientific information effectively.
  • (2B) Use qualitative or quantitative data to make rational predictions of natural phenomena.
  • (2C) Apply scientific knowledge to issues impacting society.

Field 7 (Mathematical Sciences)

Content

Goal: Students will be conversant with the essential terminology and concepts of a mathematical, statistical or algorithmic system.

Objectives:  Students will:

  • (1A) Demonstrate knowledge of the vocabulary and notation of a mathematical, statistical or algorithmic system.
  • (1B) Demonstrate understanding of the theory behind the concepts and techniques of a mathematical, statistical, or algorithmic system.

Skills

Goal: Students will have the appropriate skills and techniques used in problem analysis and solution.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Analyze and apply appropriate quantitative, theoretical, and/or computational techniques to solve problems.
  • (2B) Interpret the results of their analysis clearly. 

Attributes

Advanced Writing-Intensive

Content  

Goal: Students will demonstrate the ability to write an effectively developed logical argument.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Integrate appropriate ideas and evidence, in accordance with course content.
  • (1B) Organize those ideas and that evidence strategically for a given audience and purpose.

Skills

Goal: Students will demonstrate an understanding of appropriate or discipline-specific writing styles, standards, and conventions through a process that includes revision.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Write grammatically correct sentences that are fluid and include smooth transitions.
  • (2B) Use vocabulary that is appropriate for the purpose and audience/field.
  • (2C) Employ correct punctuation, spelling, capitalization, and documentation conventions.
  • (2D) Use appropriate citation and attribution of ideas, information, and evidence.

Oral Communication

Content

Goal: Students will compose a message and provide ideas and information appropriate to its topic, audience, setting, and purpose.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Identify the components of effective oral communication of an idea with an argument or thesis supported by evidence. 
  • (1B) Demonstrate the knowledge of how to select appropriate material that will be understood by the audience.
  • (1C) Apply organizational and explanatory strategies suitable to the topic, audience, setting and purpose of the message that is being delivered.

Skills

Goal: Students will demonstrate the ability to deliver effective oral presentations.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Speak clearly and employ a rich and imaginative vocabulary with diction and pronunciation appropriate to the context.
  • (2B) Present fluently, maintain eye contact with the audience, and use gestures appropriate to the context.
  • (2C) Define the thesis and/or purpose of the message, use smooth transitions from one section to the next, and end with a clear and direct conclusion.
  • (2D) Demonstrate the effective and judicious use of detail and evidence in substantiating and/or illuminating the presentation’s central thesis.

Global Awareness

Content

Goal: Students will demonstrate knowledge of the history, culture, and/or political systems of societies, states, and peoples other than the United States.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Identify and describe the history, social structures, political institutions, and/or patterns of cultural expression that characterize specific societies, states, and peoples outside the United States.
  • (1B) Identify the various factors that have contributed to the history and development of social structures, political institutions, and patterns of cultural expression that characterize specific societies, states, peoples, and cultures outside the United States.

Skills

Goal: Students will demonstrate how their knowledge of geographical regions other than the United States fosters greater awareness of the world in which the students live.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Critically analyze how the history, culture, and/or political systems of geographical regions other than the United States inform the way people outside the United States view themselves.
  • (2B) Critically analyze and reflect on how their knowledge of the history, culture, and/or political systems of geographical regions other than the United States inform the way in which the students understand their relationship to the world.

Justice

Content

Goal: Students will demonstrate an understanding of justice, its relationship to power, and the ways in which causes of injustice may be mitigated and justice promoted.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Compare and contrast differing theories of justice, including the ways in which justice has been defined and conceived.
  • (1B) Describe the factors that are responsible for injustice with particular emphasis upon the relationship of injustice to inequities in the distribution of power.
  • (1C) Describe the ways in which the factors responsible for injustice might be mitigated in the cause of justice.

Skills

Goal: Students will think critically about the factors that create, permit, and/or mitigate the conditions of justice or injustice.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Identify how the distribution of power is embedded in institutions, social structures, and/or codes of conduct.
  • (2B) Critically analyze theories, policies, and practices in so far as they promote either justice or injustice.
  • (2C) Demonstrate how the conditions of injustice might be mitigated by specific forms of action.

Ethics

Content

Goal: Students will demonstrate an understanding of ethical criteria and principles necessary for moral evaluation and their practical application.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Identify and articulate the fundamental elements of at least two major ethical theories.
  • (1B) Recognize the connection between ethical theory and behavior.
  • (1C) Identify and understand the core assumptions that lie at the heart of ethical behavior.

Skills

Goal: Students will demonstrate the ability to employ ethical reasoning in matters of human concern.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (2A) Critically evaluate how conceptions of moral obligation contribute to living a worthwhile life.
  • (2B) Apply ethical theories in analyzing ethical dilemmas and questions.
  • (2C) Defend an ethical position while displaying an awareness of opposing ethical arguments.

Diversity

Goal: Student will demonstrate an understanding of the diverse and multicultural character of the United States, including variables such as social class, race, gender, ethnicity, religion, or sexuality.

Objectives: Students will:

  • (1A) Identify the impact of multiple variables on the American experience.
  • (1B) Articulate the interplay of at least two of these variables on the American experience.
  • (1C) Distinguish how the power structure in America affects diverse groups. (2C) Compare and contrast the varied experiences of individuals within American society.