Latin American Studies (BA)

Director: Paola Fajardo-Heyward, PhD

Introduction

The Latin American Studies Program (LAS) is a multi-disciplinary program that students adopt as a second or third major. Its primary focus is to promote intellectual discussion, teaching and research on Latin America and the Caribbean. The program also includes the study of Latinos in the United States. Moreover, LAS engages in a wide array of community outreach activities and programming, such as colloquia, K-12 collaboration, student conferences, and visits by renowned speakers. This complements the program’s academic offerings and provides students, faculty and the local community with timely and relevant opportunities to learn about and become actively involved in issues relevant to Latin American Studies. LAS also serves to provide career opportunities for students interested in this geographical region and helps to establish stronger linkages with the Latin American and Latino communities in Western New York. For a more detailed description of the program, faculty, facilities, academic and co-curricular opportunities please go to the Latin American Studies website.  

The flexible structure of the major and minor enables students to appreciate the social, economic, political, cultural, and historical context of the subject matter, encouraging them to develop critical interdisciplinary skills. While the LAS program will include attention to the Latino communities in Western New York and the United States, its coursework and extracurricular experiences will move beyond these boundaries to view these communities as being embedded within global processes.

Advisement

All students should have an advisor in the major and should contact the department directly to have an advisor assigned if they do not already have one.  Meetings with academic advisors are required prior to students receiving their PIN for course registration each semester. All majors should work closely with their advisor in discussing career expectations, choosing their major electives, developing their entire academic program and planning their co-curricular or supplemental academic experiences.

 

Note:  Advisement is the responsibility of the Director of the Latin American Studies Program, who may share this responsibility with other members of the Latin American Studies Program Advisory Council. All Latin American Studies majors and minors are expected to consult with their advisor in the program at least once each semester.

Curriculum

An Ignatian Foundation

All undergraduate students must complete either the Canisius Core Curriculum or the All-College Honors Curriculum. Many schools refer to their college-wide undergraduate requirements as "general education" requirements. We believe that the core curriculum and the honors curriculum are more than a series of required classes; they provide the basis for a Jesuit education both with content and with required knowledge and skills attributes that are central to our mission.

Free Electives

Students may graduate with more but not less than 120 credit hours. Free electives are courses in addition to the Core Curriculum or Honors Curriculum and major requirements sufficient to reach the minimum of 120 credit hours required for graduation.

Major Requirements

The Latin American Studies major must be completed in combination with another major at Canisius. There are no limits on the number of courses that count for this major that also apply to another major.

Spanish Proficiency demonstrated with a C or higher in SPA 217 (or a 300- or 400-level SPA course) 1
Social Science and History - select 3 courses9
Latin American History to 1830
Latin American History since 1830
Comparative Government and Politics
Politics in Latin America
Select one of the following as third course:
Comparative Government and Politics
Human Rights and Globalization
Politics in Latin America
Political Economy of the Developing World
Domestic Conflicts & Peace
Latin American History to 1830
Latin American History since 1830
Wars of Latin America
U.S.-Latin American Relations since 1898
Religion, Politics, & the Presidency
Jesuits in Argentina
Doing Business in Latin America
Language, Literature, and Culture - select 3 courses from at least two different departments/disciplines9
Intro Brazilian Portuguese I
Introduction to Spanish Composition
Any SPA course at 300- or 400-level
Survey of Pre-Columbian and Native American Art
World Musics
Afro-Centric Music
Contemporary Literary Movements
Jesuits in Argentina
Latin American Philosophy
Major Electives - select 3 additional courses not already taken from the lists above 29
Senior Capstone 33
Study Abroad in Latin America or the Caribbean 4

Learning Goals & Objectives

Student Learning Goal 1

Latin American Studies majors think critically about Latin American societies, governments, and policies through both historical and contemporary lenses.

Students will:
  • Objective A: Interpret important political concepts, theories, events, actors, and processes pertinent to Latin American analyses;
  • Objective B: Apply knowledge of Latin American history and diverse cultures to contemporary social and political themes;
  • Objective C: Identify regional political, social, and economic trends and the impact of colonialism, globalization, and U.S. foreign policy towards Latin America.

Student Learning Goal 2

Latin American Studies majors use research to articulate ideas and arguments clearly and effectively in the field of Latin American Studies.

Students will:
  • Objective A: Integrate knowledge from different academic disciplines into a coherent paper, presentation or project that addresses a topic in Latin American Studies;
  • Objective B: Conduct independent research and follow appropriate formats in documenting resources;
  • Objective C: Communicate information, ideas, and research results effectively.

Student Learning Goal 3

Latin American Studies majors communicate in a modern language that is appropriate to the area of studies and necessary for professional success.

 Students will:
  • Objective A: Display competency of a Latin American language at the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) intermediate level.

Minor

General Requirement

Spanish Proficiency demonstrated with a C or higher in SPA 217 (or a 300- or 400-level SPA course)
Social Science and History - select 3 courses (students must take courses from two different departments/disciplines)9
Comparative Government and Politics
Human Rights and Globalization
Politics in Latin America
Political Economy of the Developing World
Domestic Conflicts & Peace
Latin American History to 1830
Latin American History since 1830
Wars of Latin America
U.S.-Latin American Relations since 1898
Religion, Politics, & the Presidency
Jesuits in Argentina
Doing Business in Latin America
Language, Literature, and Culture - select 3 courses (students must take courses from two different departments/disciplines)9
Intro Brazilian Portuguese I
Introduction to Spanish Composition
Any SPA course at 300- or 400-level
Survey of Pre-Columbian and Native American Art
World Musics
Afro-Centric Music
Contemporary Literary Movements
Jesuits in Argentina
Latin American Philosophy